Question about 2003 Nissan Xterra

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A/C (Magnet clutch always works)

I have a problem with governing the air conditioner on Xterra 2003 SE. Under any position of the button OFF/ON air conditioner on console ,the air conditioner continues to work. Works or does not work with periodicity 20 -30 seconds .20-30 seconds works ,20-30 seconds does not work. The Tested instrument,button on off works,leds fire.
Magnet clutch is started always ,when key A/C OFF,but key of the ventilator ON.
But with periodicity 20-30 seconds stops and is again started.
Where search for the fault? Thank you.


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  • Nissan Master
  • 11,168 Answers

Test for freon

Posted on May 03, 2017

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

SOURCE: air conditioner problem in Nissan

Check the resistor pack/board on the cabin fan

Posted on Aug 21, 2008

chrisK1997
  • 103 Answers

SOURCE: SUV WONT START

check you battery and battery cables...sounds like a big voltage drop

Posted on Feb 22, 2009

  • 383 Answers

SOURCE: air conditioner in my 2002 Xterra blows hot air

fazsoliz: If the A/C system is not properly charged, it will not cool properly. Usually it is noticed at low speeds because the compressor is turning slower. If you bring the RPM up, you would probably notice it would start to cool a little better.
HOWEVER, there is a danger if the system has been over charged and you do not have enough air flowing over the condenser to keep the head pressures down. The hotter it is outside and the more overcharged the system, the higher the pressures will be in the system. They can reach dangerously high pressures in excess of 300 psi. This can cause hoses to blow, a/c evaporators and condensers to fail and compressors to fail.
If the refrigerant is contaminated or if the system had been opened and had not been properly evacuated before charging, it could have moisture in it as well as air.
The fan which is driven by the engine is attached by a viscus coupling (designed to offer more resistance as it gets hotter, thus making the fan turn closer the the engine's rpm's). If this part is not working properly, it will not make the fan turn fast enough at slow speeds to draw the air over the a/c condenser and radiator.
I have found in very hot climates, that installing an electric fan in place of the engine driven fan made a vast improvement on the performance of the a/c at idle and low speeds. I have an old Mercedes diesel wagon which I converted from R-12 to 134-A.
The a/c would freeze you out on the highway, but you would be better off rolling the windows down in town. I removed the engine driven fan and installed an electric fan. Now the a/c will freeze you out at low speeds if you bring the rpm up to 1100, but is cold enough even at 700 rpm.
You must also check for any type of debris caught up in the a/c condenser. The more trash accumulated in the fins, the more difficulty it will have in dissipating heat. The fan schroud also must be on the radiator, otherwise the fan will have little effect in pulling
air over the condenser.
Also, put the system on recirculate after a minute or so. This way you will be cooling the air in the cabin and slowly bringing the temperature if the cabin air down and not having to fight the need to constantly cool hot air coming in from the intake vent.
I hope that what I have offeref for suggestions will help you.

Posted on Jul 19, 2009

HyeProfile
  • 35 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 2000 Nissan Xterra SE V6. My center

Before you begin to diagnose and test the stop light system (that's what's it's called in the service manual), you should look at the following
wiring diagram to try and understand how the system work. This will help you to logically walk through the diagnosis process.

d660eb1.jpg
TESTING FOR “OPENS” IN THE CIRCUIT

7c178f9.jpg

Continuity Check Method
The continuity check is used to find an open in the circuit. The
Digital Multimeter (DMM) set on the resistance function will indicate
an open circuit as over limit (no beep tone or no ohms symbol).
Make sure to always start with the DMM at the highest resistance
level.
To help in understanding the diagnosis of open circuits please refer
to the schematic above.
1) Disconnect the battery negative cable.
2) Start at one end of the circuit and work your way to the other
end. (At the fuse block in this example)
3) Connect one probe of the DMM to the fuse block terminal on
the load side.
4) Connect the other probe to the fuse block (power) side of SW1.
Little or no resistance will indicate that portion of the circuit has
good continuity. If there were an open in the circuit, the DMM
would indicate an over limit or infinite resistance condition.
(point A)
5) Connect the probes between SW1 and the relay. Little or no
resistance will indicate that portion of the circuit has good continuity.
If there were an open in the circuit, the DMM would
indicate an over limit or infinite resistance condition. (point B)
6) Connect the probes between the relay and the solenoid. Little
or no resistance will indicate that portion of the circuit has good
continuity. If there were an open in the circuit, the DMM would
indicate an over limit or infinite resistance condition. (point C)
Any circuit can be diagnosed using the approach in the above
example.

Voltage Check Method
To help in understanding the diagnosis of open circuits please refer
to the previous schematic.
In any powered circuit, an open can be found by methodically
checking the system for the presence of voltage. This is done by
switching the DMM to the voltage function.
1) Connect one probe of the DMM to a known good ground.
2) Begin probing at one end of the circuit and work your way to
the other end.
3) With SW1 open, probe at SW1 to check for voltage.
voltage; open is further down the circuit than SW1.
no voltage; open is between fuse block and SW1 (point A).
4) Close SW1 and probe at relay.
voltage; open is further down the circuit than the relay.
no voltage; open is between SW1 and relay (point B).
5) Close the relay and probe at the solenoid.
voltage; open is further down the circuit than the solenoid.
no voltage; open is between relay and solenoid (point C).
Any powered circuit can be diagnosed using the approach in the
above example.

TESTING FOR “SHORTS” IN THE CIRCUIT

To simplify the discussion of shorts in the system please refer to
the schematic below.
c2ba473.jpg

Resistance Check Method
1) Disconnect the battery negative cable and remove the blown
fuse.
2) Disconnect all loads (SW1 open, relay disconnected and solenoid
disconnected) powered through the fuse.
3) Connect one probe of the ohmmeter to the load side of the fuse
terminal. Connect the other probe to a known good ground.
4) With SW1 open, check for continuity.
continuity; short is between fuse terminal and SW1 (point A).
no continuity; short is further down the circuit than SW1.
5) Close SW1 and disconnect the relay. Put probes at the load
side of fuse terminal and a known good ground. Then, check
for continuity.
continuity; short is between SW1 and the relay (point B).
no continuity; short is further down the circuit than the relay.
6) Close SW1 and jump the relay contacts with jumper wire. Put
probes at the load side of fuse terminal and a known good
ground. Then, check for continuity.
continuity; short is between relay and solenoid (point C).
no continuity; check solenoid, retrace steps.

Voltage Check Method
1) Remove the blown fuse and disconnect all loads (i.e. SW1
open, relay disconnected and solenoid disconnected) powered
through the fuse.
2) Turn the ignition key to the ON or START position. Verify battery
voltage at the battery + side of the fuse terminal (one lead
on the battery + terminal side of the fuse block and one lead
on a known good ground).
3) With SW1 open and the DMM leads across both fuse
terminals, check for voltage.
voltage; short is between fuse block and SW1 (point A).
no voltage; short is further down the circuit than SW1.
4) With SW1 closed, relay and solenoid disconnected and the
DMM leads across both fuse terminals, check for voltage.
voltage; short is between SW1 and the relay (point B).

GROUND INSPECTION

Ground connections are very important to the proper operation of
electrical and electronic circuits. Ground connections are often
exposed to moisture, dirt and other corrosive elements. The corrosion
(rust) can become an unwanted resistance. This unwanted
resistance can change the way a circuit works.
Electronically controlled circuits are very sensitive to proper
grounding. A loose or corroded ground can drastically affect an
electronically controlled circuit. A poor or corroded ground can easily
affect the circuit. Even when the ground connection looks clean,
there can be a thin film of rust on the surface.
When inspecting a ground connection follow these rules:
1) Remove the ground bolt or screw.
2) Inspect all mating surfaces for tarnish, dirt, rust, etc.
3) Clean as required to assure good contact.
4) Reinstall bolt or screw securely.
5) Inspect for “add-on” accessories which may be interfering with
the ground circuit.
6) If several wires are crimped into one ground eyelet terminal,
check for proper crimps. Make sure all of the wires are clean,
securely fastened and providing a good ground path. If multiple
wires are cased in one eyelet make sure no ground wires have
excess wire insulation.

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Posted on Aug 05, 2009

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: Air conditioner works intermittent

check the thermo control amp, it's a sensor in the evaporator, it is there to keep it from freezing, they are a common nissan problem

Posted on Sep 22, 2009

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