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Brake pedal travel gets worse over 6 months and feels spongy. problem recurs again after bleeding the brakes.

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Any leakage at the brake wheel cylinders? If so, you must replace leaking wheel cylinders.

More likely is a worn master cylinder. Replacement is necessary. This is not typically a diffucult job, but important to do it right. It sounds like you have the brake bleeding down, and you will need to do this after the master cylinder replacement! Be sure to bleed all 4 corners!

Regards,

Brian

Posted on Sep 24, 2008

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1997 mercury sable gs 3.0l replaced master brake, still having brake pedal feeling spongy and slowly traveling down. i bench bled master brake and bled brake right rear left rear right then front.


If the master cylinder is replaced, care must be taken to prime the new master cylinder by removing all of the air and completely filling it with brake fluid. The spongy feeling is air that is still in the circuits. You will need to bleed the back brakes as well as the front ones again. The order that you bled them seems correct, but perhaps there remained some air in the main trunk lines.

For the best results 2 people are needed. Start at the further distance wheel cylinder and bleed at least three (3) master cylinder reservoir volumes of fluid (back brakes). Bleed the fluid with use of a piece of tubing attached to the bleed port that is long enough to reach almost to the bottom of a long neck or tall clear jar (clear drink bottle works well). When the bleeding begins, after one or two brake pedal pushes, make sure that the end of the tubing is below the surface of the fluid and keep it under. It best to have a clear bleed line (to observe air). Keep pumping the brake pedal while being careful to not completely empty the master cylinder reservoir (leave 1/4 full always). Repeat the same technique for each wheel cylinder with at least two (2) reservoirs full for front brakes. Partially close the bleed ports when almost finished (at least 5 pedal strokes without exit of any air). Completely close the ports during the down stroke of the brake pedal, with the tubing still attached. Be sure each bleed port is closed snuggly.
Most of the brake fluid can be reused, but not the darker portion at the bottom of the jar.

Oct 09, 2016 | 1997 Mercury Sable

1 Answer

So I just changed the clutch master cylinder and the braided brake line in my 2000 camaro ss and am trying to bleed the system. The routine I'm using is typical. Pump the pedal 30 times keep it depres


you have someone helping you right? cuz you cant do it yourself, and the brakes need to be pumped only enough to get a solid midway stop of pedal travel, and with the brake still depressed by your assistant, you open the bleeder a bit until the pedal goes to the floor, you tighten bleeder, they then release brake pedal and pump it up again, rinse, repeat, until there is no spongy feel in brake pedal

Mar 21, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I replaced front and back brakes on my 1996 1500 Chev Suburban. Bled the brakes starting at the farthest line. The pedal is soft and travels too far. Does not seem to stop very good. What is the...


it sounds like there is still air in the brake system that has not been removed.you don`t say if you replaced the brake pads and shoes(in which case you shouldn`t need to bleed)or you replaced a brake line(s) or wheel cylinder or caliper.you will have to keep bleeding the brakes all 4 wheels(trucks don`t use bi-directional braking meaning right rear brakes with left front and so on).bleed both rear brakes then bleed both front brakes,was this problem there before you replaced the brakes(soft pedal noticed) and this is why you changed the brakes or the pedal was soft and the brakes needed changing.its possible that the master cylinder has an internal leak and may need replacing.

Apr 06, 2011 | Chevrolet Suburban 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Have an 89 festiva changed 5 master cylinders and still cant bleed front driver and rear pass wheel and also changed distribution block 3 times. i cant bleed it rite from the front port of the master...


Section 06-06: Hydraulic Brake System 1992 Festiva Workshop Manual GENERAL SERVICE OPERATIONS Manual Bleeding
  1. Read Hydraulic System Bleeding General Information.
  1. Clean all dirt from the master cylinder filler cap.
  1. Fill the master cylinder with the specified brake fluid. During the bleeding operation do not allow the master cylinder to run dry.
  1. If the master cylinder is known or suspected to contain air it must be bled before the wheel cylinders or calipers. To bleed the master cylinder, loosen the front line fitting and have an assistant push the brake pedal slowly through its full travel. While the assistant holds the pedal, tighten the brake line fitting. After the line fitting is tightened, the assistant may release the brake pedal. Repeat this procedure on the rear brake line. Repeat the entire process several times to ensure all air has been removed from the master cylinder.
  1. Remove the bleeder screw cap from the appropriate rear wheel cylinder.
  1. Position a box end wrench on the bleeder fitting.
  1. Attach a rubber hose to the bleeder fitting. The hose has to fit snugly around the bleeder fitting.
  1. Submerge the free end of the hose in a container partially filled with brake fluid.
  1. Loosen the bleeder fitting approximately three quarters of a turn.
  1. Have an assistant push the brake pedal slowly through its full travel and hold it there.
  1. Close the bleeder fitting.
  1. Have the assistant release the brake pedal.
  1. Repeat Steps 9 through 12 until air bubbles cease to appear at the submerged end of the bleeder hose.
  1. When the fluid entering the bottle is completely free of bubbles, tighten the bleeder screw, remove the bleeder hose, and install the bleeder screw cap.
  1. Repeat Steps 5 through 14 at the appropriate diagonal front caliper.
  1. Check the master cylinder fluid level. If necessary fill it to the correct level with the specified brake fluid.
  1. Check pedal feel. If the pedal remains spongy, repeat the bleeding process or, if necessary, refer to Diagnosis and Testing in Section 06-00.

Jan 04, 2011 | 1991 Ford Festiva

1 Answer

2003 rav 4, just replaced front calipers and pads, after bleeding the line,peddle was spongie, bled all four lines, peddle still spongie, do I need the engine running to properly bleed the lines, and since...


I would bleed the rears too especially if the brake fluid reservoir drained empty. Also you may need to drive the vehicle to seat the brake pads. Check and see how the pedal feels initially before you road test to make sure you don't need to pump the brakes in order to stop. if you do then re bleed all four wheels.If you don't have to pump the pedal and it just feels spongy then try going around the block a few times and see if the pedal stiffens up after the pads have seated.

Oct 11, 2010 | 2003 Toyota RAV4

1 Answer

I am having problem bleeding the brakes on my 2002 kia sportage.Every time I bleed the brakes I only get the peddle up just a bit but not enough.Is there a special way to do bleed them.There doesn't seem...


When bleeding never allow the Masrer Cylinder get below 1/4 full or you will introduce more air, which will mean starting over again. I helps if you have a length of clear plastic tubing that fits snugly over the tip of the bleed nipple so that you can see if there is any air bubbles being released. You usually start at the rear wheel that has the longest run of pipe from the master cylinder. Next is the other rear wheel. Next is the front wheel with the longest run and last is the remaining front wheel. Proceedure:
1. Have an assistant pump the brake pedal 3 or 4 time then hold down an maintain weight on pedal as it drops when fluid is released.
2. Release bleed nipple and observe fluid coming out for bubbles then retighten when flow stops.
3. Assistant then allows pedal up and waits for a few seconds for cylinder piston to refill fully.
4. Repeat from #1 until no more air bubbles are visible, then go to next wheel.
If pedal still feels a little spongy repeat process after a couple of days driving with engine running so that any remaining tiny air bubbles are purged.
You should also make sure that the brake pedal free travel adjustment is correct because if the free travel is insufficient, it will not allow the master cylinder to operate correctly..

Aug 28, 2010 | 2002 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

New front calpers can,t get bleed spongy pedal


sometimes it may take a while to bleed the brakes, to bleed the brakes you need two people. to bleed brakes properly: make sure car is off and brake fluid is full, have someone pump up the brake pedal until it feels hard and hold it down once it is hard(make sure when you loosen the bleed screw the person pushes the pedal to the floor), have another person loosen the bleed screw until the brake pedal is on the floor of the car. repeat as needed and check the brake fluid often when doing this

Jun 20, 2010 | 2002 Oldsmobile Aurora

1 Answer

1997 Pontiac Grand Am Front right brake caliper not working right


Check the brake hoses. The rubber hoses that come from the hard line, (Metal), to the caliper.
If these are the original ones that came with the vehicle, they are overdue to be changed out.

Do they have any weather cracking on the outside? No? That's okay as they break down on the inside, and sometimes this isn't apparent from the outside.

The rubber brake line is a composite. A sheath on the inside, then a steel braided hose, then another sheath on the outside.
The sheath on the inside breaks down, and a piece of the rubber compound blocks the hose opening, when you step on the brake pedal.

The brake line can also swell up a little, as you step on the brakes, causing that spongy feel.

Jul 21, 2009 | 1996 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

I have Nubira 2000, I changed the brake pads but even though no use the brake effeciency is very less.


after fitting new brake pads you must "bed them in"
by doing a few high speed brake applications of medium to hard brake applications
say 80 km/h hit the brakes down to 40km/h giving a pause in between to let brakes cool down again
if pedal feels spongy or you have to pump pedal up to get a high brake pedal you might have air in brake lines
you should allways bleed brakes after replacement incase of air ingress into system

Jun 04, 2009 | 2000 Daewoo Nubira

1 Answer

LOW BRAKE PEDAL ON 4 WHEEL DISK BRAKES


Check the pads/rotors to see if they need to be replaced.
Check the brake fluid level. If low it could mean the pads/rotors need to be replaced. If replacing also replace the brake fluid.
Two years probably means you need a brake job.

Otherwise you may have air in the brake lines which you can bleed off.

May 07, 2009 | 1999 Chrysler 300M

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