Question about 1985 Volkswagen Jetta

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Replacing the valve cover gasket on a 1985 1.8L Jetta

Removing the cover isen't rocket science untill you get to the cam tensioner end. Do you have any tricks or can you explain the process?

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  • Lorincz Sep 29, 2008

    Solved it myself ! Remove the Allternator / water pump belt, remove the top 2 nuts which hold the timing belt cover to the valve cover. In the center of the timing belt cover there is a 6mm allen head nut which secures into a rubber o-ring socket. remove this nut and the cover can be lifted off, then the valve cover can be removed and gaskets replaced.

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Have you tried removing the the timing belt cover for better access.

Posted on Nov 28, 2008

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Replacing a head gasket in a 1993 buick century


Before head gasket replacement have you checked these
Intake Manifold Gaskets May Leak Coolant or Engine Oil
engine or leak. In some cases, an internal coolant leak may occur causing coolant to mix with the engine oil. Our technicians tell us that operating the engine with a coolant/oil mix can result in internal engine damage. Replacing the intake manifold gasket should correct these leaks.
Leaking Water Pump May Cause Coolant Loss and Overheating
A coolant leak may develop from the . The may overheat as a result of the coolant loss. A leaking water pump should be replaced.
Headgasket replacement
step 1. undo negative battery cable or completely remove battery and tray.
step 2. remove air cleaner and associated piping if it is in the way to allow access to head, drain cooling system and remove upper radiator hose.
step 3. remove top portion of exhaust manifold.
step 4. remove intake manifold and fuel injection rail as necessary
step 5. remove spark wires and valve cover.
step 6. remove drive belts and top timing cover before removing timing belt find all alignment marks and paint to improve your visibility and aid in reassembly if no marks are present remove spark plug # 1 and rotate until piston is at tdc and check timing mark on crankshaft that it is on 0 then paint the belt and cams anything that has teeth that the timing belt rides on make a mark to aid in reassembly even if you are replacing t-belt at least you can compare to new belt and transfer marks, release tension on t-belt tensioner and remove t-belt.
step 7. remove head bolts start loosening at inside and work outwards reemove head bolts and pay attention to sizing and placement.
carefully check for anything that is still attached to head and if free tap head with rubber or dead blow hammer to free from block and lift straight up so as not to ruin or bend any of the alignment pegs.
step 8. remove head gasket material with non-scratching tools or scrapers or buff pads made for that job. making note of where it was blown.
step 9. decide if you should send head to machine shop to have mating surface made flat again and also to have valves and related parts inspected or replaced. usually about $300-$400
step 10. inspect block remove all gasket material look for pitting or scarring also use straight edge to determine if it is straight or if it needs to be resurfaced by a machine shop.
step 11. install new headgasket and check fit. If all is good reassemble in reverse order of removal and I always like to replace crank seal ,cam seal, water pump, t-belt and tensioner also thermostat, drivebelts, spark plugs, cap, rotor, wires, pcv valve, intake manifold ,exhaust manifold gaskets.
this is just a broad overview hope it helps you will have to get haynes manual or similar for head torque values and what not

Aug 05, 2014 | 1993 Buick Century

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Setting Timing Without 3 So Called SPECIAL TOOLS Needed


1997-2000 Ford Contour 2.0L DOHC Camshaft Set up For timing Belt Replacement.most Instructions Call For 3 Different Special Tools No NeedFORD UPGRADED TIMING PULLEYS AND TENTIONERS In a UPGRADE KIT
Remove Valve Cover And TOP Timing Belt Cover CUT BELT OFF, Go to Rear of CAMSHAFTS (OppositeSPROCKETS) Look and you will see SLOTS at the end of Each CAM they are CUT ECCENTRICALLY . Use a Piece of Sturdy FLAT STOCK HARD STEAL (STRAIGHT) Turn CAMS one at a TIME Until they are EVEN With COVER GASKET SURFACE of Head, ALIGN BOTH Cams this Way Insert FLAT STOCK IN SLOTS So CAMS Don't Spring Back, And you Have VALVE TRAIN TIMED PERFECTLY, #1 Spark Plug OUT Bar Over to TDC WOODRUF KEY Should be Pointed Straight UP. This Is ALL there is to IT. Proceed with Timing Cover Removals and front Mount, REPLACE ALL PULLEYS AS A KIT (SOLD AS KIT) Install Timing Belt Set Tensioner According to KIT Instructions ans this will Illuminate All Special Tools SAID to be NEEDED for this Procedure, (( REMOVE FLAT STOCK AT CAMSHAFT ENDS AFTER BELT IS TIGHTENED.Install New Valve Cover Gasket #1 Spark Plug and Job is Done. Cuts 1 Hour 15 Minutes off Flat Rate

on Dec 31, 2009 | Ford Contour Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a Jetta GLS that is misfiring we did a tune up replace spark plugs and wires and still doing it once on a while not all the time.


My 2004 Jetta GLI had same problem. I took it to the dealer and they informed me of Recall# 28F3 to replace the ignition coils. Replaced and fixed problem at no cost. Of course, that was until they also recommended a timing belt, tensioner, water pump replacement ($923); camshaft adjuster seal and valve cover gasket seeping ($496); and electrical cooling fan replaced ($357)... maybe so, but freakin dealers :-)

Feb 07, 2011 | 2004 Volkswagen Jetta

2 Answers

Blown head gasket


if you are going to do it yourself you are going to need the following spares :

New headgasket and the specialized tools.

An engineering shop will need to skim the head for you and while you have the head off you can just as wel do the valve guides, valve seats, replace the valves and the valve springs.

Best is to try and get a workshop manual (not owners manual) and follow the steps in there.

Note that a head needs to be torqued, and for this you will need a torque wrench.

Repairing a blown head gasket is not rocket science however it will require more than basic mechanic skills and typing it out on a help forum like this one isn't really practical. And removing the head you can also replace the timing belt, and THIS is where the workshop manual comes in handy (valve timing is critical or you can for all intends and purposes destroy the engine).

Like i said, its not rocket science but without the right steps and settings its not something you just figure out if you arent a serious mechanic.

Oct 11, 2010 | 1991 Mazda 626

1 Answer

My hyundi accent is leaking oil form the head cover gasket? what do i need to do to fix it?


You need a valve cover gasket set a metric socket set and some common sense. It's not rocket science to do this job.

May 14, 2010 | 2002 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

Timing belt


Required tools:
13mm open end wrench 10mm shallow and deep socket 8mm socket long flathead screwdriver 17mm deep socket T50 torx socket 1/4", 3/8ths and 1/2" ratchets and extensions E10 inverted torx sockets 6mm Allen wrench 15mm open end wrench 7mm socket 12mm open end wrench 14mm socket 12mm socket 8mm, 9mm and 10mm Allen head sockets 19mm socket pry bar needle nose pliers
If you are doing this because your timing belt broke you will also need to buy a complete cylinder head, head gasket set, and both idler pulleys. ALL DAEWOO MODELS WILL BREAK THE INTAKE AND EXHAUST VALVES WHEN THE TIMING BELT BREAKS.
Start by removing the air cleaner assembly from the throttle body, remove the air filter and housing jack up the vehicle and remove the wheel, remove the plastic shielding in front of the accessory drive belt assembly, remove the accessory drive belt, place a jack with a block of wood on top underneath the engine oil pan remove the front engine mount, remove the crank shaft pulley ( the 4 Allen head bolts only not the 17mm bolt in the center.) remove the metal plate behind the engine mount bracket on the engine, remove the plastic timing belt cover 3 clips on top 2 10mm bolts on bottom. Rotate the engine until the #1 cyl. is at Top Dead Center on the compression stroke or line up the crankshaft timing mark with the mark on the inner timing belt cover ( notch in cover with notch in pulley) on the camshaft pulleys -- ( intake cam line up the line on the pulley with the line on the inner cover)( exhaust cam line up the arrow on the pulley with the arrow on the inner cover) loosen the 13mm bolt in the belt tensioner and using the Allen wrench rotate the tab until there is slack in the belt. Remove the belt. At this time I would recommend you replace the water pump, both plastic idler pulleys as they tend to overheat and lockup, and the belt tensioner. Make sure all your marks are lined up, you may need a helper to hold the Exhaust Cam in place as it tends to move during belt installation. Put the timing belt underneath the crankshaft pulley, install the belt leaving the intake cam for last and NO BELT SLACK on the right side between the crank and the exhaust cam. Once the belt is installed rotate the crankshaft over 2 revolutions and make sure is rotates freely, and your timing marks are aligned perfectly if not the engine will not run properly, tension the belt as needed. Installation is the same as removal.

To clarify, on the DOHC engine, the intake cam gear has a line on it, and the exhaust cam gear has an arrow on it. These should be lined up with the corresponding line and arrow on the VALVE COVER, pointing straight up. I just went through this process over the weekend, and spent quite a bit of time looking for these marking as I had removed the valve cover. Once I found them, it was plain and simple.
In addition, be sure to not over tighten the belt when reinstalling. The tensioner has markings on it for "old" and "new". DO NOT adjust past "new", as the car will sound like a jet engine, and the belt will not last for very long.
One more item that you may as well replace while you are in there is the cam position sensor if you have not already, as there have been issues with them, and the timing housing has to be opened to get to it

Nov 30, 2009 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change a timing belt on a 2000 DAEWOO LEGANZA


Follow these instructions to the letter, if u get this wrong u will bend the valves in the engine.

Required tools:
13mm open end wrench 10mm shallow and deep socket 8mm socket long flathead screwdriver 17mm deep socket T50 torx socket 1/4", 3/8ths and 1/2" ratchets and extensions E10 inverted torx sockets 6mm Allen wrench 15mm open end wrench 7mm socket 12mm open end wrench 14mm socket 12mm socket 8mm, 9mm and 10mm Allen head sockets 19mm socket pry bar needle nose pliers
If you are doing this because your timing belt broke you will also need to buy a complete cylinder head, head gasket set, and both idler pulleys. ALL DAEWOO MODELS WILL BREAK THE INTAKE AND EXHAUST VALVES WHEN THE TIMING BELT BREAKS.
Start by removing the air cleaner assembly from the throttle body, remove the air filter and housing jack up the vehicle and remove the wheel, remove the plastic shielding in front of the accessory drive belt assembly, remove the accessory drive belt, place a jack with a block of wood on top underneath the engine oil pan remove the front engine mount, remove the crank shaft pulley ( the 4 Allen head bolts only not the 17mm bolt in the center.) remove the metal plate behind the engine mount bracket on the engine, remove the plastic timing belt cover 3 clips on top 2 10mm bolts on bottom. Rotate the engine until the #1 cyl. is at Top Dead Center on the compression stroke or line up the crankshaft timing mark with the mark on the inner timing belt cover ( notch in cover with notch in pulley) on the camshaft pulleys -- ( intake cam line up the line on the pulley with the line on the inner cover)( exhaust cam line up the arrow on the pulley with the arrow on the inner cover) loosen the 13mm bolt in the belt tensioner and using the Allen wrench rotate the tab until there is slack in the belt. Remove the belt. At this time I would recommend you replace the water pump, both plastic idler pulleys as they tend to overheat and lockup, and the belt tensioner. Make sure all your marks are lined up, you may need a helper to hold the Exhaust Cam in place as it tends to move during belt installation. Put the timing belt underneath the crankshaft pulley, install the belt leaving the intake cam for last and NO BELT SLACK on the right side between the crank and the exhaust cam. Once the belt is installed rotate the crankshaft over 2 revolutions and make sure is rotates freely, and your timing marks are aligned perfectly if not the engine will not run properly, tension the belt as needed. Installation is the same as removal.

To clarify, on the DOHC engine, the intake cam gear has a line on it, and the exhaust cam gear has an arrow on it. These should be lined up with the corresponding line and arrow on the VALVE COVER, pointing straight up. I just went through this process over the weekend, and spent quite a bit of time looking for these marking as I had removed the valve cover. Once I found them, it was plain and simple.
In addition, be sure to not over tighten the belt when reinstalling. The tensioner has markings on it for "old" and "new". DO NOT adjust past "new", as the car will sound like a jet engine, and the belt will not last for very long.
One more item that you may as well replace while you are in there is the cam position sensor if you have not already, as there have been issues with them, and the timing housing has to be opened to get to it

Nov 13, 2009 | 2000 Daewoo Leganza

3 Answers

Timing Belt Tensioner bolt broken off.


You may have a serious problem (timing belt tensioner). This tensioner keeps the belt 'taut' so it won't jump time. Daewoo engines are 'interferrence' engines (this means if the valve timing is 'off' (out of syncronization) you can damage/bend the valves in the head -- valve timing (timing belt ensures this). The solution is to take the vehicle into the shop and have it diagnosed to be sure/to know if any damage has occured -- if none, replace the tensioner... it's pretty simple to do, if you have the service manual.

May 26, 2009 | 2000 Daewoo Nubira

1 Answer

Timing belt replace daewoo 1.5 1995


follow this procedure.
Required tools:
13mm open end wrench 10mm shallow and deep socket 8mm socket long flathead screwdriver 17mm deep socket T50 torx socket 1/4", 3/8ths and 1/2" ratchets and extensions E10 inverted torx sockets 6mm Allen wrench 15mm open end wrench 7mm socket 12mm open end wrench 14mm socket 12mm socket 8mm, 9mm and 10mm Allen head sockets 19mm socket pry bar needle nose pliers
If you are doing this because your timing belt broke you will also need to buy a complete cylinder head, head gasket set, and both idler pulleys. ALL DAEWOO MODELS WILL BREAK THE INTAKE AND EXHAUST VALVES WHEN THE TIMING BELT BREAKS.
Start by removing the air cleaner assembly from the throttle body, remove the air filter and housing jack up the vehicle and remove the wheel, remove the plastic shielding in front of the accessory drive belt assembly, remove the accessory drive belt, place a jack with a block of wood on top underneath the engine oil pan remove the front engine mount, remove the crank shaft pulley ( the 4 Allen head bolts only not the 17mm bolt in the center.) remove the metal plate behind the engine mount bracket on the engine, remove the plastic timing belt cover 3 clips on top 2 10mm bolts on bottom. Rotate the engine until the #1 cyl. is at Top Dead Center on the compression stroke or line up the crankshaft timing mark with the mark on the inner timing belt cover ( notch in cover with notch in pulley) on the camshaft pulleys -- ( intake cam line up the line on the pulley with the line on the inner cover)( exhaust cam line up the arrow on the pulley with the arrow on the inner cover) loosen the 13mm bolt in the belt tensioner and using the Allen wrench rotate the tab until there is slack in the belt. Remove the belt. At this time I would recommend you replace the water pump, both plastic idler pulleys as they tend to overheat and lockup, and the belt tensioner. Make sure all your marks are lined up, you may need a helper to hold the Exhaust Cam in place as it tends to move during belt installation. Put the timing belt underneath the crankshaft pulley, install the belt leaving the intake cam for last and NO BELT SLACK on the right side between the crank and the exhaust cam. Once the belt is installed rotate the crankshaft over 2 revolutions and make sure is rotates freely, and your timing marks are aligned perfectly if not the engine will not run properly, tension the belt as needed. Installation is the same as removal.

To clarify, on the DOHC engine, the intake cam gear has a line on it, and the exhaust cam gear has an arrow on it. These should be lined up with the corresponding line and arrow on the VALVE COVER, pointing straight up. I just went through this process over the weekend, and spent quite a bit of time looking for these marking as I had removed the valve cover. Once I found them, it was plain and simple.
In addition, be sure to not over tighten the belt when reinstalling. The tensioner has markings on it for "old" and "new". DO NOT adjust past "new", as the car will sound like a jet engine, and the belt will not last for very long.
One more item that you may as well replace while you are in there is the cam position sensor if you have not already, as there have been issues with them, and the timing housing has to be opened to get to it

Mar 14, 2009 | 1999 Daewoo Lanos

2 Answers

I need to replace the valve cover gasket on my voltswagon jetta


you probably mean the valve head gasket.

In this case this is serious work and you should contact a local VW dealership or mechanic and have them do this work for you to insure a job well done. If you simply mean your Valve cover, then this is no big deal and can be done by taking out the 4 screws found at the corners of the valve cover and then simply lifting the cover free and replacing it with a new one/tightening the screws back down.

hope this helps :)

May 17, 2008 | 1992 Volkswagen Jetta

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