Question about 1997 BMW 318

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Brakes fit new rear discs pads & shoes now front brakes are juddering when braking gently at junctions ok when braking hard

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Did you get the rotors machined to specs or just change the pads.If not machined suggest you get them checked to see wether they should have been.This affects ABS equipped vehicles more severely

Posted on Oct 11, 2008

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I have a 23 t bucket and i cant get a brake pedal.when i bought it had very little brake so i replaced rear shoes and cylinders,front pads and calipers,all new lines and the master cylinder


Once you have bled the air from the brake lines,clamp off the front brake hoses carefully.Does the pedal feel better now?
Then the pad /caliper fit is allowing too much play.Is the pedal the same?Then clamp the rear hose and try the pedal.Is it fine with the rear hose clamped?If so we now know the problem is at the rear brakes.One common low pedal rear brake cause is brake shoes that do not fit the drums.Remove the drums and look at the shoes,are they showing contact wear fully or just in the middle of the shoe?Remove a shoe and place it in the drum.Can you rock the shoe against the drum surface?Once drums have been resurfaced,the shoes will not fit fully against the drum allowing the shoe the flex when applying pressure to it and this can easily create a low soft brake pedal. Of course rear brake adjustment must be correct once brake shoe contact is correct.To correct brake shoe contact,have your shoes re arc-ed to fit resurfaced drums or install new drums.Don't overlook brake master cyl /brake pedal push rod adjustment too.

Jun 24, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Brake peddle is low,


Pedal, not peddle. First make sure reservoir is full at the brake master cylinder. Then check your brake pads (for disc brakes) and/or brake shoes (for drum brakes). When the pads or shoes are very worn down, you will get a low pedal. If you have disc brakes on the front and drums on the rear wheels, first try just replacing the front brake pads. If you get a good pedal after the front is done, many people tend to let the rear brake shoes go unless they are making noise. These systems are designed to put most of the braking force on the front discs, so the rear shoes do not need changing as often.

May 11, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Honda CB1300 front brakes (2004)brake judder why?


try greasing the caliper slides if that doesn't work the caliper may need rebuild or replacing.

Apr 15, 2017 | Honda Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Squealing at the right front wheel


The brake lining's have worn away, the squealing was metal to metal (worn pad against metal disc) The worn pad will have damaged the brake disc. Very dangerous. You will now have to have new brake pads and discs fitted to BOTH front wheels to put it right. Good luck

Jan 27, 2014 | 1997 Mitsubishi Pajero

2 Answers

When i press my brakes it judders and makes a loud noise


Ok, if it shakes in the seat when braking then it is the rear brakes, if it shakes the steering wheel it is the front brakes. New pads and Discs, but were the discs turned on a lathe? They shouldn't need to be turned if they were brand new, but....

Nov 11, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

3 Answers

Rear brake pads wear out every 30000 miles on 2002 3/4 tod hd , rotors are pitted bad


That's to be expected and is completely normal.

Rear brake shoes as fitted to drum brakes can typically last up to 60k miles with periodic adjustments, but you have rear disc brakes and the shoes will typically last half of that.

Also, modern brake pads no longer contain asbestos and are now made using harder metallic compounds; the direct result is that brake discs (US=rotors) are also considered to be consumable items as they are worn down by the harder pads. It's not unusual to have to replace front discs every other pad change and rear ones with every pad change; in both cases the mileage will typically be around 30k miles on most models.

Nov 15, 2009 | 2002 GMC Sierra 2500HD

1 Answer

Rear brake disc needs replacing


with car on stands use punch to remove pad retaining pins pull out pads can be tight remove 2 calliper retaining bolts move calliper away from disc remove disc retaining bolts remove disc check hand brake shoes and clean look for adjuster between shoes if it has one back it of some models just have hand brake cabel adjustment clean and fit new disc secure adjust hand brake shoes using screw driver through wheel bolt hole clean refit calliper slowley push back calliper pistons fit new pads refit retaining pins do other side pump up brake pedal check and adjust handbrake if neededcheck brake fluid level

Oct 20, 2009 | 2001 Volvo S80

2 Answers

How do you put on drum disk and colaps the shoe pads


If they are drum brakes, make sure you turn the self adjustment screw all the way closed. If they are disc brakes you need to use a brake tool to screw the calliper piston in. Just loosen the bleeder valve and screw the piston in counter clockwise.

May 02, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

How do I reinstall the parking brakes on my 2001 GMC Jimmy.


hi from the uk not too conversant with your model ? BUT here in uk the same type of rear calipers for hydraulic disc brakes and a seperate set of brake shoes operate the park brake/s which is internal of the rotor ?? thebrake shoes will have an adjuster manually adjustment when rotor/drum is in place ? so if you look at the area between the top of shoes you may see a threaded rod with a serrated round wheel which when turned on thread will move shoes out one way and in the other ? so to fit rotor you must rotate this wheel so shoes close up enableing to fit rotor/drum over shoes easily ? then secure rotor with screws?? if fitted then you adjust ppark brake shoes by turning with a flat screwdriver via a hole which is/should? be in rotor and will turn in line with this adjuster? tighten brake on then turn back notch by notch till rotor turns free or just? do this b4 you fit the disc pads then repeat on other brake assy on other side? re assemble discpads and pump brakes till hard this then leaves the park brake cable to adjust if req'd if so pull p/brake it should come up approx 4 or 5 clicks to fully lock of brake this allows for what is known as reserve travel left on cable to apply as brake shoes wear ok? hope this helps?

Jan 16, 2009 | 2001 GMC Jimmy

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