Question about 1998 Dodge Neon

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Cooling fan relay 1998 neon

Cannot find the cooling fan relay on a 1998 plymouth neon. fan will not come on when engine gets hot. DTC is 1491 (rad fan relay control circuit).
rans are good and so are the fuses. want to test the relay next but dont know where it is. anybody help?

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  • John Jon May 11, 2010

    I know it's location are you still loooking?

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On the left(driver's) side of the lower rad support. It's a small flat relay with a plug on the bottom and usually has a blue colored front. held on by two screws. Also, there may be more rad fan relays in the underhood fuse/relay box.
Good luck.
R

Posted on Feb 27, 2009

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This may be a late posting, however for future neon fan relay searchers just look under the battery tray. Remove the battery and battery tray then it will be located on the same wall as the two bolts that hold the bottom of the battery tray. Just before the radiator. Its tough to catch but u can access it from the bottom of the vehicle also. its much simpler just to remove the battery tray. Hope this helps.

Posted on Dec 28, 2009

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2005 montana sv6 sitting in traffic temp gauge goes up codes P0128 and P0481 present


DTC P0128 Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Below Thermostat Regulations Temperature
An engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor monitors the temperature of the coolant. This input is used by the powertrain control module (PCM) for engine control and as an enabling criteria for some diagnostics.
The air flow coming into the engine is accumulated and used to determine if the vehicle has been driven within the conditions that would allow the engine coolant to heat up normally to the thermostat regulating temperature. If the coolant temperature does not increase normally or does not reach the regulating temperature of the thermostat, the diagnostics that use ECT as enabling criteria may not run when expected.
If the PCM detects the calibrated amount of air flow and engine run time have been met, and the ECT has not met the minimum thermostat regulating temperature, DTC P0128 sets.

P0481
Cooling Fan Relay 2 Control Circuit
PCM
DTC P0480 or P0481

Have you changed the thermostat ?
Do you know how to test cooling fan relay (S)
Battery positive voltage is supplied to the cooling fan 1 relay from the COOL FAN #1 fuse. The powertrain control module (PCM) controls the cooling fan 1 relay by grounding the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit via an internal solid state device called a driver.
Battery positive voltage is supplied to the cooling fan 2 relay and the cooling fan 3 relay from the COOL FAN #2 fuse. The PCM controls the relays by grounding the high speed cooling fan relay control circuit.
When the PCM is commanding a relay on, the voltage potential of the control circuit should be low, near 0 volts. When the PCM is commanding the control circuit to a relay, the voltage potential of the circuit should be high, near battery voltage. If the fault detection circuit senses a voltage other than what is expected, the DTC will set.
The PCM will monitor the control circuit for the following conditions:
• A short to ground
• A short to voltage
• An open circuit
• An open relay coil
• An internally shorted or excessively low resistance relay coil
When the PCM detects any of the above conditions, the DTC will set and the affected driver will be disabled.

Jul 01, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

FANS WONT COME ON ,,ALL FUSES,RELAYS AND ELECTRIC FAN MOTORS ARE NEW,,THERMOSTAT IS GOOD,,WHERE IS ELECTRIC FAN TEMP SENSOR LOCATION


op
why not post symptoms first and not a barrage of parts.
must we decode that to a symptom,. kinda hard right.

I will not guess. what is wrong, nor what is not working on your car. now what fans you are talking about, up to 4 fans on cars.

cab blower fan (wild guess blower is ok) and so is HVAC, ?
radiator fans
Condenser fan.

my wild guess to , engine over heats?????????
if yes, the scan it first. no not last FIRST.
it dont work like you think its not a 1988 Samurai.
sorry,
on modern cars, they got smarter, the engine goes
gee the PCM knows water temp why have a fan temp regulator.
hark , now it dont. (saves cash on useless parts)
but has a relay , (well until you have my car and the relay is now 100% electronic, called a huge transistor)
we've used this tech in industry for years, but car makers just learning how still.
i digress. but evolution and history helps diagnosis.
what is there?

Ill look for you, ive posted this 100s of times
the book is 4 bucks to see online. the real deal
lets look now.
XL-7 (the dash matters big time)
answering for , overheats engine, and fans on RAD dead.
(some are staged, PCM brains... now. and also chain ops based on if A/C is on or not) facts.
first I see 2 fans... ok.
the next page shows nice block diagram of the fan system
yup, NOT Simple.

ill post those words for you.
"The engine cooling fan system consists of 2 electrical cooling fans and 3 fan relays. The relays are arranged in a series/parallel configuration that allows the engine control module (ECM) to operate both fans together at low or high speeds. The cooling fans receive positive voltage from the cooling fan relays which receive battery positive voltage from the underhood fuse block.
During low speed operation, the ECM supplies the ground path for the low speed cooling fan relay which is fan 1 relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the low speed fan relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and supplies battery positive voltage from the fan 1 fuse through the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the left cooling fan. The ground path for the left cooling fan is through the series/parallel relay which is fan 2 relay, and the right cooling fan. The result is a series circuit with both fans running at low speed.
During high speed operation the ECM supplies the ground path for the low speed fan relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. The ECM grounds the high speed fan relay, which is fan 3 relay, and the series/parallel relay, which is fan 2 relay through the high speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the series/parallel relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and provides a ground path for the left cooling fan. At the same time the high speed fan relay coil is energized closing the relay contacts and provides battery positive voltage from the fan 2 fuse 1 on the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the right cooling fan. During high speed fan operation, both engine cooling fans have their own ground path. The result is a parallel circuit with both fans running at high speed.
When the request for fan activation is withdrawn, the fan may not turn OFF until the ignition switch is moved to the OFF position or the vehicle speed exceeds approximately 16 km/h (10 mph). This is to prevent a fan from cycling ON and OFF excessively at idle.
end quote.

i bet you didnt scan it , like 99.9 % of all posters here dont.
DTC Descriptors
DTC P0480: Cooling Fan Relay 1 Control Circuit
DTC P0481: Cooling Fan Relay 2 Control Circuit
DTC P0691: Cooling Fan Relay 1 Control Circuit Low Voltage
DTC P0692: Cooling Fan Relay 1 Control Circuit High Voltage
DTC P0693: Cooling Fan Relay 2 Control Circuit Low Voltage
DTC P0694: Cooling Fan Relay 2 Control Circuit High Voltage
Diagnostic Fault Information

is the ECT showing overheat, yes no?
if yes, it must operate a fan or 2.
the book even covers all tests for fans dead, in a large truth table.
both the FSM and alldata.com have that, its no secret ,its published in 4 major places.

lets back up
if the engine coolant is low (no that side tank the engine and rad)
the ECT will lie. if that happens the fans may not come one
that is because the ECT is useless measuring air, for water.
that water must touch ECT for ECT to work.
this is FIRST
then scan the ECT does it show overheating, IT must if it IS overheating. fix that next if it lies to you,(IR gun in hand)

The system has staged fans.
i cant find the trip points in my crappyy online pages.
but is like 225f then 250f trips. is my guess...
about. if the engine over heats, check fuses first then scan it.
it will simply tell you why its bad.
eg, fan1 output dead.
or if you hot wire a fan and its dead, then it is.
(only on cars with non modulated fans,,hot wire them,else not.)

now the link to the 4 buck real book.
the non dash XL7 (my guess) you this pick yourself... cant see car.
https://suzukipitstopplus.com/Products/10182-2007-xl7-service-manual.aspx

this is how it really works
the ECU has software that decide trip points for fans.
hard coded, this is. based on how hot it is and if A/C is on not.
its way smarter than 1988 and better.
the DTC errors can see an open line, shorted to ground or stuck 12v.(runs all time error)
(tells you relay is good or not)

25839272-0kjd5huq4lpr130nt243wle5-3-0.jpg no scanner no joy , sorry, tis a fact.....

25839272-0kjd5huq4lpr130nt243wle5-3-2.jpg

Aug 27, 2015 | 2007 Suzuki XL-7

1 Answer

I have an 05rendezvous,need to locate switches for cooling system,fans aren't co ming on & now I'm going to need a new radiator,cuz plastic broke.But it broke before fans gave out.Which I changed stat


The engine cooling fan system is controlled by the body control module (BCM) and the powertrain control module (PCM) or engine control module (ECM). The BCM performs the calculations as to how long, when and what speed the cooling fans should turn on. The BCM then sends a class 2 message to the PCM/ECM to engage the cooling fan relays. If there is a malfunction with the BCM, the PCM/ECM will control the engine cooling fans independently. The engine cooling system consists of 2 electrical cooling fans and 3 fan relays. The relays are arranged in a series/parallel configuration that allows the PCM/ECM to operate both fans together at low or high speeds. The cooling fans and fan relays receive battery positive voltage from the underhood accessory wiring junction block. The ground path is provided at G100.
During low speed operation, the PCM/ECM supplies the ground path for the low speed fan relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the cooling fan 1 relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and supplies battery positive voltage from the cool fan 1 fuse through the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the left cooling fan. The ground path for the left cooling fan is through the cooling fan 2 relay and the right cooling fan. The result is a series circuit with both fans running at low speed.
During high speed operation the PCM/ECM supplies the ground path for the cooling fan 1 relay through the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit. After a 3 second delay, the PCM/ECM supplies a ground path for the cooling fan 3 or S/P relay and the cooling fan 2 relay through the high speed cooling fan relay control circuit. This energizes the cooling fan 2 relay coil, closes the relay contacts, and provides a ground path for the left cooling fan. At the same time the cooling fan 2 relay coil is energized closing the relay contacts and provides battery positive voltage from the cool fan 2 fuse on the cooling fan motor supply voltage circuit to the right cooling fan. During high speed fan operation, both engine cooling fans have there own ground path. The result is a parallel circuit with both fans running at high speed.
The BCM and PCM/ECM command Low Speed Fans on under the following conditions:
?€¢
Engine coolant temperature exceeds approximately 106?°C (223?°F).


?€¢
A/C refrigerant pressure exceeds 1 310 kPa (190 psi).


?€¢
After the vehicle is shut off if the engine coolant temperature at key-off is greater than 140?°C (284?°F) and system voltage is more than 12 volts. The fans will stay on for approximately 3 minutes.

The BCM and PCM/ECM command High Speed Fans on under the following conditions:
?€¢
Engine coolant temperature reaches 110?°C (230?°F).


?€¢
A/C refrigerant pressure exceeds 1 655 kPa (240 psi).


?€¢
When certain DTCs set.


The three relays are located in the under hood fuse / relay box ! You need to have it checked for DTC'S -diagnostic trouble codes ! An you need a GM Tech 2 scan tool !
This diagnostic procedure supports the following DTCs:
?€¢
DTC P0480 Cooling Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit


?€¢
DTC P0481 Cooling Fan 2 and 3 or S/P Relay Control Circuit


?€¢
DTC P0691 Cooling Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit Low Voltage


?€¢
DTC P0692 Cooling Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit High Voltage


?€¢
DTC P0693 Cooling Fan 2 and 3 or S/P Relay Control Circuit Low Voltage


?€¢
DTC P0694 Cooling Fan 2 and 3 or S/P Relay Control Circuit High Voltage


  1. Install a scan tool.
  2. Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
  3. With a scan tool, command the Fans Low Speed ON and OFF.
Do the low speed engine cooling fans turn ON and OFF with each command?
Go to Step 3
Go to Step 4

3

Important:: A 3 second delay occurs before the powertrain control module (PCM)/engine control module (ECM) changes the cooling fan speed.
With a scan tool, command the Fans High Speed ON and OFF.
Do the high speed engine cooling fans turn ON and OFF with each command?

Aug 08, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1999 Dodge Neon Issues (HELP)


Here's a link to the P0340 code,and P1491.Powertrain Diagnostics Manual P-1491 Radiator Fan control relay circuit
Set condition: An open or shorted condition is detected in the radiator fan relay control circuit.

Possibilities:
Fan relay ground circuit open
Fused B+ circuit open
Rad fan control relay defective
RF relay output circuit volt cycles over to batt voltage
RF relay control circuit open
RF relay ctrl rly ckt wir harness observable or intermittant defect
RF relay ctrl ckt short to ground
Defective PCM

Get out your Multimeter.

Mar 22, 2013 | 1999 Dodge Neon

2 Answers

I was in a minor fender bender ( bumped the car in front of me and did little cosmotic damage.) After that my check engine light came on. The code is P1491 Manufacturer Control Axillary Emissions...


The DTC (Data Trouble Code) P1491 for Chrysler-Jeep is for the Radiator Fan Control Relay Circuit, and the radiator fan control relay is located between the radiator and the AC condenser, and there is the possibility that a collision could have damaged the radiator control relay or the wiring. Here is an image of a chrysler radiator control relay to help assist you.




zaraki_31.jpg

Nov 28, 2010 | 2003 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

What does trouble code 758 and 1491 on a Plymouth Voyager mean?


Code 1491 on Plymouth Voyager is Radiator fan not working, Check wire fitting to be tight, Check fuse and fan relay could be bad swap out the relay to another relay many of these are the same #

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Common engine problems in a 98 plymouth neon


go to dodgeproblems.com/neon--this sight will tell all!! have a good day!! just click on your year vehicle when page comes up.

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1997 dodge neon. replaced coolant temperature


1997 Plymouth Neon, have replaced radiator, radiation cap, thermostate and hoses, still run hot. Fans do not seem to come on, where is the temperature sensor on this vehicle?

Aug 05, 2009 | 1997 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

I have a 98 plymouth neon (DHOC) that runs hot.


Take rad cap off when cool & run it for a while with the heater on (not defrost) and top up coolant as needed in rad, about an inch or 2 from top of rad. Let it run until you see rad fan come on & off about 2 or 3 times at operating temperature. Then replace cap, top up return bottle to proper level, and try that. Probably still air in system. If that doesn't cure it, I'd look at faulty or incorrectly installed thermostat, which would be a trip to shop that installed it, if it were me.

Jun 02, 2009 | 1998 Plymouth Neon

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I am having trouble with my speedometer not working occasionally and now my seat belt light is coming on sometimes too. Is this the instrument panel cluster? Or something else? 1998 Dodge Neon. Backstory is as follows: -We take very good care of it and have one dedicated mechanic. -It has only had two owners; my parents and I. -We replaced the battery 2 months ago. -Mechanic checked to make sure the speedometer sensor was working. -We have had issues with the radio for years where it will randomly turn on and off, typically brought on by a stuffed trunk OR wet weather. -The speedometer works until we hit a bump and then the needle flies up and down or sometimes just stops working all together. -Mechanic has made mention of there being some Chrysler specific battery cable that is a smaller side cable and it is not in good condition. -Currently, my problem is that I can't find an old 1998 Dodge Neon in the salvage yard because yards are doing a lot of 2002 and newer vehicles and automatically crushing the others. The meat and potatoes of my question is what direction do I go in? And what of these symptoms ties to each other? And will adding new solder to the points on the panel fix it or is it something else? I'm trying to find least expensive to most expensive options and I'm rather handy but can't drop an engine or transmission or anything so keep this in mind. My handiness ends at resoldering the pins BUT I do have a mechanic I trust, but I fear that maybe I'm not combining symptoms properly. I have the money to repair an item I KNOW is wrong but not to chicken hunt around for problems.

Mar 22, 2017 | 1998 Dodge Neon

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