Question about 2000 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cabs

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Cylinder five gets no power to or from new coil-packs...several have been tested

I have a 2000 f-250 v-10 that gets no power at cylinder 5. I have replaced the ignition coil for the three coils that were diagnosed as bad (5,6,& 10) on yesterday. But five keeps re-appearing as mis-firing, from new diagnostics,and no power is shown from the volt-meter. Somehow five is dead even with all new wires, boots, motorcraft plugs etc. The computer is somewhat hot as compared to previous days, could it have shut-down coil five since 6 & 10 have cleared after replacing the two ignition coils.Is this an electrical problem ie coil five needs rewiring, or is this possibly a computer problem since it is awfully hot always now?

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Disconect the pcm and check the continuity of the suspected circuit...Any other codes? Have you check compression? Have you checked injector pulse?...

Posted on Sep 15, 2008

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I had a missfire code saying cylinder 2 n it was missing but drivable.. Now its not its shaking horribly n i put a new new coil pack on n plug n wires n still rough low idle n coil pack is super hot to...


Try switching the new coil pack to a different cylinder and check if the miss follows the new coil pack or stays at #2. Just because the coil pack is new don't mean it cant be bad also. You did say it was getting real hot.

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Number five plug not firing


I'm assuming this is a DIS(distibutorless ignition system).If it is,the most common cause is a defective coil pack.Each coil will fire a pair of cylinders together on 4 and 6 cylinder engines(one "waste" spark,one to ignite the mixture).Try swapping the wires at the coil pack to see if the misfire follows the coil tower,or the same cylinder misfires(keep in mind that a check engine light means you will have to clear the code to get the computer to feed that cylinder fuel before you start it up again).If the other cyl on the pack now misfires(i believe 1+5 are on the same pack on a Ford engine),then the coil is bad(spark is "leaking"to ground).If the same cyl still misfires,try swapping a wire+plug from another cylinder.

Mar 14, 2012 | 1996 Mercury Cougar XR7

1 Answer

Have 1998 toyota camry LE 3.0 5 cylinder. Has been running rough for about 2 weeks. Check engine light came on. Test said spack issue on cylinder 5, Had this problem once and was coil pack. could it be the...


A fuel filter would not have an effect on one cylinder
& you know how long it was in the car
It could be there 3 to 5 years & be just fine

Don't assume that a code last time that pointed you to a bad
coil will happen that way again.

Codes don't really tell you to change anything
You could have a code for #5 & walk a new coil for 4 cyl's
until you get to # 6 now you found the bad one.

You have several coil packs that feed more than one
plug, you have more to consider

I approach this the way I am, as you most likely
can not test anything, because you lack the proper
equipment ,so you have to do things the hard or longer
way of trial & error. Just don't throw money & parts at
it in doing so

Are the O2 Sensors really old? Over 80,000 miles
Do you have any vacuum leaks including exhaust before
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Sep 22, 2011 | 1998 Toyota Camry

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I have a 97 thunderbird V6 3.8L that is misfiring in cylinders 2 and 6. I tested all the plug wires at the plug connection with a calibrated tester, there is no spark at the plug. I have changed the plugs,...


Did you replace the coil pack or just verify 12 volt power to it? if both old and new coil packs have the same issue, (no spark on 2 and 6), then the harness to the coil pack has broken wires or bad connection(in the connector itself), or the computer is faulty. I believe each plug wire tower on the coil pack has it's own signal wire in the harness. Understand that the towers are "paired" together.
For example, cylinder layout.... 1 - 2 - 3
4 - 5 - 6
Depending on the firing order and the actual layout of your cylinder's the above layout would mean
1 and 4 get the signal to spark,(at the same time), even though 1 is on its power stroke, and 4 is on its exhaust stroke. Hope this is clear as mud!

Aug 21, 2011 | 1997 Ford Thunderbird LX

1 Answer

My 92 dakota is not getting any spark


Engine Fails To Start

The "Checking For Spark'' test should be performed prior to this test.

This is a basic test of the ignition system that systematically examines the battery, the coil, the engine controller, and its wiring harness and connections; the most likely culprits in a no-start condition at this stage.
88472304.gif

Fabricate this special jumper with a 0.33 MF capacitor in-line to test the ignition coil
Click to Enlarge

  1. Unplug the ignition coil harness connector at the coil.
  2. Connect a set of small jumper wires (18 gauge or smaller) between the disconnected harness terminals and the ignition coil terminals.
88472314.gif

Terminal locations on the engine controller 14-way connector-1989 models
Click to Enlarge 88472305.gif

Engine controller 60-way connector-relevant terminals for testing are shown numbered
Click to Enlarge

  1. Attach one lead of a a voltmeter to the positive (12V) jumper wire. Attach the negative side of the voltmeter to a good ground. Measure the voltage at the battery and confirm that enough current is available to operate the starting and ignition systems.
  2. Crank the engine for five seconds while monitoring the voltage at the coil positive terminal:
    1. If the voltage remains at zero, diagnosis of the fuel system should be performed. Also check the engine controller and auto shutdown relay.
    2. If voltage is at or near battery voltage and then drops to zero after one or two seconds of engine cranking, check the engine control module circuit.

WARNING

The ignition must be turned OFF prior to unplugging the engine controller connector. If it is not, electrical surging could occur causing damage to the unit or other electrical components in the vehicle.

  1. If the voltage remains at or near battery voltage during the entire five seconds, turn the ignition key OFF. Remove the 14-way connector on 1989 models, or the 60-way connector on 1990-96 models at the engine controller. Check the 14-way or 60-way connector for any spread terminals.
  1. Remove the test lead from the coil positive terminal. Connect an 18 gauge jumper wire between the battery positive terminal and the coil positive terminal.
  2. Make a special jumper cable (see illustration). Using the jumper MOMENTARILY ground terminal 12 on the 14-way connector (1989), or terminal 19 (see illustration) of the 1990-96 60-way connector. A spark should be generated at the coil wire when the ground is removed.
    1. If a spark is generated, replace the engine controller computer.
    2. If no spark is seen, use the special jumper to ground the coil negative terminal directly. If spark is produced, repair the wiring harness for an open circuit condition. If spark is not produced, replace the ignition coil
    this is for distributor ignition
THIS IS TESTING OF DISTRIBUTORLESS IGN
Testing

This procedure requires an ohmmeter to test the coil packs for primary and secondary resistance (specifications are given for an ambient temperature of 70-80°F/21-27°C).
88472320.gif

The two coil packs contain five independent coils, which fire paired cylinders (shown numbered)
Click to Enlarge

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Determine the manufacturer of the coil. It should be labeled either a Diamond or Toyodenso.
88472779.gif

Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine front coils
Click to Enlarge 88472780.gif

Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine rear coils
Click to Enlarge

  1. Check the secondary resistance of each individual paired coil by connecting an ohmmeter across the coil towers. This must be done between the correct cylinder pairs: 3/2, 7/4, 1/6, 9/8, or 5/10. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 11,300-15,300 ohms. For a Toyodenso manufactured coil pack, resistance should be 11,300-13,300 ohms.
88472323.gif

Use an ohmmeter to check secondary resistance as shown

  1. Check the primary resistance of the front coil pack by attaching an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal and either the right (cylinders 3/2), center (cylinder 7/4), or left coil (cylinders 1/6) terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
  2. To test the primary resistance of the rear coil pack, attach an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal (see illustration) and either the right (cylinders 9/8), or left (cylinders 5/10) coil terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
i hope this helps any more questions repl if help at all plz vote or comment me

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I have a 2002 TrailBlazer with the straight 6,diognostic check said #3 cylinder was dead or misfiring, also map sensor showed up. #3 cylinder was misfiring, so to test the coil pack I swapped #3 coil pack...


did you replace only one spark plug? that can cause issues because of differences in resistances between cylinders. also, did the map code stay off after replacing
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Missing out


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Sometimes start up with only five celenders.


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Jan 14, 2009 | BMW 325 Cars & Trucks

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