Question about 1993 Toyota Camry V6

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RADIATOR FAN ENGIN HEATS UP. I HAVE CHANGED WATER PUMP,THERMOSTAT ,FLUSHED COOLENT AND CHANGED THE BELT. RADIATOR FAN RUNS SLOW. WHAT SHALL I DO?

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  • Toyota Ed May 11, 2010

    Do you have hydraulicly powered radiator fans? They were unique to the 93 V6...

  • Anonymous Mar 20, 2014

    I replaced my thermostat switch but my fan still does not go on. My heat gauage shows the car over heat and there is evaporation coming from my engine water overflow.

  • Anonymous Mar 30, 2014

    leaks when coolent is added to radiator

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If you've got the hydraulic fan, check to see that the solenoid at the power steering pump is plugged in. My 1993 3.0 had this happpen, and that's what was wrong. You have to pull the front passenger side wheel off to access the pump. Just stick your hand up in there and feel around. You'll find it. One way to check is to let the car idle and turn the a/c on full blast. You should hear the fan start to roar after a few seconds. If it doesn't, then check the solenoid wire. Worked for me!

Posted on Sep 14, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Does anybody have a video link on how to flush the cooling system on a GM 3.1L SFI OHV 6cyl motor? I need a vid for this particular motor cause mine is still overheating & i have looked everywhere.


flushing a cooling system is the same method as any other motor

do it without the thermostat fitted
or water pump opening

sacrifice an old radiator hose to adapt a garden hose fitting
for radiator flush

air in system fix
your thermostat housing has no air bleed valve
no top radiator cap

old school way
heater on full
run motor till thermostats fully open
burp radiator hoses
wait till water is running up into over flow bottle without bubble
replace cap
turn off heater
correct level in over flow bottle

why still over heating
you fitted everything i would have ... yet still overheat
possibles
leaking inlet manifold gaskets
hose clamps loose
cooling fans spinning too slow
thermostatic fan switch faulty
aluminum radiator is a big one
air ..fins bent or some water channels blocked

or possible head gasket leak




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Nov 02, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My car over heats when i drive above 100, what is d problem, its an mk4 golf with an automatic transmission


not an auto matic fault

engine checks to make
soft hoses
clogged radiator ..try a flush
thermostat
thermatic fan temp switch
thermatic fans might be spinning too slow
water pump worn


or a head gasket .?

May 20, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1998 cherokee jeep over heating.took out thermostat changed water pump hoses raditator water seems to not be flowing into block


thermostat in backwards.the part that senses temperature change isn't exposed to the hot coolant inside the engine. , or coolent passages clogged, here is what sometimes will happen:

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They can and will totally clog up, try to flush the system if not too far clogged.

Dec 17, 2013 | 1998 Jeep Cherokee

2 Answers

2005 Nissan Sentra overheating. Changed the water pump. Did a radiator flush. What else could it be??


Some thing too check:
Make sure coolant level is up to line and clean (not dirty, do to clogged radiator, may need to be flushed or replaced).
Make sure air flow through the out side of radiator is clear (dirt, leaves, ect..) .
Make sure fan is working properly equip t (is not running too slow). Or Manual (belt driven) fan clutch is working properly, not loose or spinning too freely?
Check for broken or cracked fan blades itself.
Check radiator cap, (no gasket tears).
Could be thermostat going bad ?
Could be coolant temperature sensor/switch (from computer) going bad?
Check radiator hose(s) (too soft, may collapse)?
In some rare cases:
Timing could be off.
Could be water pump.
Could be blown head gasket(s).
Could have cracked head(s).
ECT..............Hope this was some help???


Jul 25, 2011 | 2005 Nissan Sentra

2 Answers

I have a 2001 dodge dakota 4.7 litre v8 truck is running hot replaced hoses , thermostat, radiator cap, coolent temp sensor, rdaiator fan relay, flushed system, bleed system, still running hot coolent...


my be the heat sensor indicating wrong reading or you might be having a gasket problem but only if water level is decreasing and/or change into milky or brown color in coolant color

Jun 06, 2011 | 2001 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

Just replaced radiator, now its over heating?


thermostat or heat sencer on the radiator flush it with coolent flush. and use 50/50 coolent

Dec 06, 2009 | 2000 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

Engine over heats 2000 cadallic deville northstar engine


flush your radiator first.with the thermostat out you should see the water moving if not bad water pump.this engine needs the thermostat to function properly and either a 50/50 coolant or straight coolant so it does not boil over.also make sure your fans are coming on

Sep 20, 2009 | 2000 Cadillac DeVille

3 Answers

1994 mercedes s class over heats


The engine is kept cool by a liquid circulating through the engine to a radiator. In the radiator, the liquid is cooled by air passing through the radiator tubes. The coolant is circulated by a rotating water pump driven by the engine crankshaft. The complete engine cooling system consists of a radiator, recovery system, cooling fan, thermostat, water pump and serpentine belt.

Check the coolant level in the recovery bottle or surge tank, usually mounted on the inner fender. With the engine cold, the coolant level should be at the FULL COLD or between the FULL HOT and ADD level. With the engine at normal operating temperature, the coolant level should be at the FULL HOT or HOT mark. Only add coolant to the recovery bottle or surge tank as necessary to bring the system up to a proper level. On any vehicle that is not equipped with a coolant recovery bottle or surge tank, the level must be checked by removing the radiator cap. This should only be done when the cooling system has had time to sufficiently cool after the engine has been run. The coolant level should be within 2 in. (51mm) of the base of the radiator filler neck. If necessary, coolant can then be added directly to the radiator.

While you are checking the coolant level, check the radiator cap for a worn or cracked gasket. If the cap doesn't seal properly, fluid will be lost and the engine will overheat.

Worn caps should be replaced with a new one.

Periodically clean any debris; leaves, paper, insects, etc. from the radiator fins. Pick the large pieces off by hand. The smaller pieces can be washed away with water pressure from a hose.

Carefully straighten any bent radiator fins with a pair of needle nose pliers. Be careful, the fins are very soft. Don't wiggle the fins back and forth too much. Straighten them once and try not move them again. It is recommended that the radiator be cleaned and flushed of sludge and any rust build-up once a year. If this has not been administerd withn the stated time, this may be why your veihicke is overheating at this time. Have the Radiator flushed asap if this is the case.

Now, if the coolant level is proper and, the cap is in fair or good condition, i would advise to move in the direction of the cooling fans and sensors as well. These fans are vital to the cooling process as well. The cooling fans must cycle in intrevals to keep the coolant cool during stop and gp driving or, long idle. They are also very important during the operational period of the AC durign trale as well. i recommedn inspecting the cooling fans while the engien is running. they shoudl cycle during the running period. if thsi is not the case, you will need to test the operational value of these devices. The test procedure follows below


TESTING


1. If the fan doesn't operate, disconnect the fan and apply voltage across the fan terminals. If the fan still doesn't run, it needs a new motor.

2. If the fan runs, with the jumpers but not when connected, the fan relay is the most likely problem.

3. If fan operates but a high current draw is suspected continue with the following ammeter TESTING.

4. Disconnect the electrical connector from the cooling fan.

5. Using an ammeter and jumper wires, connect the fan motor in series with the battery and ammeter. With the fan running, check the ammeter reading, it should be 3.4-5.0 amps; if not, replace the motor.

6. Reconnect the fan's electrical connector. Start the engine, allow it to reach temperatures above 194°F and confirm that the fan runs. If the fan doesn't run, replace the temperature switch.



Ok, Now we will move on to the next possible issue. The water pump. ok, due to the fact that your pump is driven by the drive belt, you will need to start the engine and listen for bad bearing, using a mechanic's Stethoscope or rubber tubing.

* Place the stethoscope or hose on the bearing or pump shaft.
* If a louder than normal noise is heard, the bearing is defective.

Replace the pump in this case.

You will also notice leakage around the pump housing if the seal has failed as well. this will strain the impeller and, ruin the pump.

Now. the last area of concern will be the thermosta. this is the most common issue that will inflict overheating in many vehicles. The thermostat is used to control the flow of engine coolant. When the engine is cold, the thermostat is closed to prevent coolant from circulating through the engine. As the engine begins to warm up, the thermostat opens to allow the coolant to flow through the radiator and cool the engine to its normal operating temperature. Fuel economy and engine durability is increased when operated at normal operating temperature.


There are several ways to test the opening temperature of a thermostat.

One method does not require that the thermostat be removed from the engine.

* Remove the radiator pressure cap from a cool radiator and insert a thermometer into the coolant.
* Start the engine and let it warm up. Watch the thermometer and the surface of the coolant.
* When the coolant begins to flow, this indicates the thermostat has started to open.
* The reading on the thermometer indicates the opening temperature of the thermostat.
* If the engine is cold and coolant circulates, this indicates the thermostat is stuck open and must be replaced.

The other way to test a thermostat is to remove it.

* Suspend the thermostat completely submerged in a small container of water so it does not touch the bottom.
* Place a thermometer in the water so it does not touch the container and only measures water temperature.
* Heat the water.
* When the thermostat valve barely begins to open, read the thermometer. This is the opening temperature of this particular thermostat.
* If the valve stays open after the thermostat is removed from the water, the thermostat is defective and must be replaced.
* Several types of commercial testers are available. When using such a tester, be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions.
* Markings on the thermostat normally indicate which end should face toward the radiator. Regardless of the markings, the sensored end must always be installed toward the engine.
* When replacing the thermostat, also replace the gasket that seals the thermostat in place and is positioned between the water outlet casting and the engine block.

* Generally, these gaskets are made of a composition fiber material and are die-cut to match the thermostat opening and mounting bolt configuration of the water outlet.
* Thermostat gaskets generally come with or without an adhesive backing. The adhesive backing of gaskets holds the thermostat securely centered in the mounting flange, leaving both hands of the technician free to align and bolt the thermostat securely in place.

Sep 07, 2009 | 1994 Mercedes-Benz S-Class

1 Answer

Same problem , car has only 86,000 miles


replace that thermostat again...flush radiator any way...then see how it runs...

Aug 28, 2009 | 1996 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

1996 Jetta appears to overheat but no coolent loss


the temp sensor is the trigger for the fans!!
the thermostat may be in upside down??
check new thermostat in a pot of water & heat it up watch that it opens up when it heats up should be at aroun 96 degrees F
otherwise the radiator may need a good clean out or a recore!
there my be a blocked water gallery so engine may need a flush aswell
Cheers Rob

Aug 16, 2009 | 1996 Volkswagen Jetta

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