Question about 1994 Ford Aerostar Extended

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94 aerostar steering piece

I nhave a bent ? im not sure what is caklled but it is the part that you adjust toe you know with the treaded coupling and it attaches between the steering cylinder and the wheel hub with a ball joint. im not sure about the other side it is enclosed in gromet and is a ballinside a pined i believe i remove the pin and nt it off?
im not sure what this bent uniy is called.. can you help?

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Hello,
the tie rod? you remove the nut on the other side of the ball and its out. if it what i'm thinking of.
thanks for using fixya

Posted on Sep 11, 2008

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Can you tell me what the Front suspension settings are ?


no vehicle make model. year supplied so the answer is generic but applies to most vehicles toe in is 1/8 -1/4 inch
caster 1 to 1 1/2 degrees and camber 1/2 2 degrees ( all measurements are positive
tire wear is the best guide to wrong alignment
wear on the inside or outside of the tire tread is alignment and toe -in
in the middle or on the outsides of the tread is pressure problems
wheel wobble at speeds ( 30mph up ) is castor adjustment, loose tie rod ends , ball joints and if the castor is approaching negative setting , will, not recenter the wheel after cornering
I suggest that you take the vehicle to an accredited suspension/ wheel alignment shop with experience on your make of vehicle and have it inspected
good shops will recommend that the rear is checked/ adjusted first as much front tire wear can be traced to the back being out

Sep 20, 2016 | Holden Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I have a 2010 Ranger 4x4 one front wheel campher and toe in are considerable off. What do I adjust to correct?


the camber is set on these by the bushings (offset) in the spindle platform and the bushing at anchor point near other side of arm , generally its not repairable its replaceable ! the toe is set by the screw adjustments ball joints attached to rack and pinion steering module , also are you sure its not the wheel bent, use the spare tire to ck adjustments or move a back wheel up front and test it again

Aug 12, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I replaced the tires on my 2003 mitsubishi eclipse 2 months ago & the front two have worn to the wires on both sides. a week ago there was still some tread on them. why could this be happening?


1. What brand and model of tire was fitted?

2. Please describe the wear pattern on the front tires in more detail. For example is the excessive tread wear.....
A. Right across the face of the tread on each tire or
B. On the outside edges of the tread on each tire or
C. on the inside edges of the tread on each tire or
D. on both sides of the tread but not on the center section of the tread on both tires.
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B is normally caused by incorrect toe setting - toe in
C is also normally caused by incorrect toe setting - toe out
D is normally caused by tire pressure set way too low.

Faulty steering and suspension components can also cause abnormal tire wear for any component that affects the wheel alignment settings.
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If you can provide a better description of the tire wear on each front tire you will get a better answer.

Dec 28, 2015 | 2003 Mitsubishi Eclipse GS

2 Answers

My huskee supremes front wheels turn outward and steering is off what causes this


im assuming you are talking about a lawn mower as I used to have a huskee it was a great mower and not a pack of well tamed dogs , although im confused as to why this post is in the car forum ? but anyways without more details its a guess but id say someone hit a solid object while driving it and the tie rod ends have bent or broken , a tape measure will confirm the tale as you need to measure what inside(back) and outside(front/toe) front tire measurement are ??? , the two should be equal if not slightly front(toe) out or "more" but not by more than 1/2 inch

Jul 29, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I want to know how to fix the alignment on my 1995 honda accord ex.


Before making wheel alignment adjustment, perform the following checks:
  1. Tires should be equal in size and runout must not be excessive. Tires and wheels should be in balance, and inflated to manufacturer's specifications.

  2. Wheel bearings must be properly adjusted. Steering linkage and suspension must not have excessive looseness. Check for wear in tie rod ends and ball joints.
  3. Steering gear box must not have excessive play. Check and adjust to manufacturer's specifications.
  4. Vehicle must be at curb height with full fuel load and spare tire in vehicle. No extra load should be on vehicle.
  5. Vehicle must be level with floor and with suspension settled. Jounce front and rear of vehicle several times and allow it to settle to normal curb height.
  6. If steering wheel is not centered with front wheels in straight-ahead position, correct by shortening one tie rod adjusting sleeve and lengthening opposite sleeve equal amounts.
  7. Ensure wheel lug nuts are tightened to torque specifications
Ride Height Adjustment

Before adjusting alignment, check riding height. Riding height must be checked with vehicle on level floor and tires properly inflated. Passenger and luggage compartments must be unloaded. Bounce vehicle several times, and allow suspension to settle. Visually inspect vehicle from front to rear and from side to side for signs of abnormal height.
Measure riding height. See figure. Riding height between left and right sides of vehicle should vary less than 1′ (25.4 mm). If riding height is not within specification, check suspension components and repair or replace them as necessary.
Wheel Alignment Procedures

Honda recommends using commercially available computerized 4-wheel alignment equipment. Follow equipment manufacturer instructions to obtain vehicle alignment settings. Use following procedures for necessary adjustments.
Civic Camber Adjustment
Compare camber settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If camber is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck camber.
Civic Caster Adjustment
DO NOT use more than 2 shims. If more than 2 shims are required to adjust caster angle, check for bent or damaged suspension components.
Compare caster settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If caster is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck caster.
Civic Toe-In Adjustment

  1. Secure steering wheel in straight-ahead position. Measure front wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, loosen tie rod lock nuts. Turn both tie rods equally in the same direction until front wheels are in straight-ahead position and toe-in reading is correct. Tighten tie rod lock nuts. Reposition tie rod boots if twisted.
  2. Ensure parking brake is released. Check rear wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, hold adjusting bolt on rear compensator arm and loosen lock nut. See figure. Adjust rear toe-in by sliding rear control arm until rear toe-in is correct. Install NEW lock nut, and tighten it while holding adjusting bolt.
Wheel Alignment Specifications

  • Camber - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0 (range -1 to 1)
    • Rear: 0.33 (range -1.33 to 0.67)
  • Caster - Measurement in degrees.
    • 1.17 (range 0.17 to 2.17)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in inches (mm).
    • Front: -0 (0)
    • Rear: 0.08 (2.0)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0.00 (range - 0.16 to 0.16)
  • Toe-Out On Turns - Measurement in degrees.
    • Inner: 41.00
    • Outer: 33.50
Torque Specifications Ft. Lbs (N.m)

  • Rear Control Arm Adjusting Bolt: 48 (65)
  • Spindle Nut: 136 (185)
  • Tie Rod Lock Nut: 41 (55)
  • Wheel Lug Nuts: 80 (108)
hope this helps you out.

May 09, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

1 Answer

2001 chevy silverado steering wheel vibration problem


bent alloy, bent steel rim, broken belting inside of tire(caused from hitting a good size hole). lug nuts not torqued to correct ft lbs, outer or inner tie rods, toe/ cmber out of adjustment. Are the tires wearing? If not, forget the camber/toe

Dec 14, 2009 | 2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer

4 Answers

I keep having to replace wheels on my car.... the wheels are wearing unevenly i took it to a guy and he says the that there is a bar under there that keeps the wheels strait up and that bar is bent so my...


was your car in a wreck since you have own it?
that would be the only way anyone could bend steering or suspension parts.if your tires are leaning out on top,
it would be a part called"lower control arm assembly",
if you stand in front of your car with the steering wheel straight,and your tires are pointing in on each side,or pointed out instead of straight,that would be a "tie rod "
there is an inner tie rod and an outer tie rod end.
you need to take your car to a shop that does alignments,and have them tell you exactly what is wrong,you can even get lower control arm assemblies
from a salvage yard.but do yourself a favor and don't take your car to a MONROE or MIDAS type shop,they are only there to sell and make commissions! Find a normal shop that the owner is the mechanic.

Nov 26, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

2 Answers

REPLACING LEFT TIE RODS


Genreally speaking the outter tie rod is only worn. The inner connection to the rack is more of a coupling than a rod end. You will need a 22 mm openend wrench and probally a 16mm and a 18mm opened wrench. A set of pliers to remove the old and bend the new cotterpin. Remove wheel cover and loosen the wheel nuts. Jack up the car and place jack stand or wood blocking, (or as a minimum place the wheel you removed) under the car to prevent the car from falling on you while it's in the air. Do not rely on the jack to keep the car up. Cars are heavy. remove wheel Loosen jam nut that locks the tie rod end to the connecting rod of the steering rack, spray adjustment treads with penetetrating oil to help it spin free. You may have to lock the adjustable shaft by the placing wrench on the hex portion of the shaft just inwards of the tread. Remove the cotter pin from the tie rod end. Remove nut. Take hammer and drive the tie rod from the steering knuckle. To help with the alignment of the front wheel try not to move the the steering knucle brake assembly. Unscrew the tie rod , lubricate the tread and in stall the new one. adjust the treads so that the tie rod slides back into the steering knuckle without turning the knuckle. Install the tie rod nut, tighten and secure with new cotterpin. Do not tightnen the jam nut that locks the tie rod nut to the inner adjustment rod for the steering rack, instead place the wheel back on the car, lower car and finish tightnen. with the car lowered, position the car steering wheel straight. Look at right side wheel. You should be able to line the the edges of the front wheel with your eye's with the outside edge of the rear wheel. if this doesn't line up check steering wheel postion. Now after seeing what the wheel alaignment looks like on the right side, go to the left side. If you look along the outside of the left ire and you see the tread of the rear tire , you have to muckh toe out. Lenghten the adjustmne t rod by turning it clockwise. If when you look along the edge of the tire and you don't see the rear tire, turn the rod counter clockwise. Adjust slowly and always check that the steering wheel is in the straight position. Once you have it fairly close to straight, lock the jam nut on the tie rod and take to a wheel alignment company for finishing adjustment. Good luck.

Jul 14, 2009 | 2001 Chevrolet Malibu

3 Answers

Wheel alignment


The main cause of steering wheel off-center is toe misalignment or rear axle misalignment. Toe can fall out of adjustment fairly easily as a result of daily driving, so you can imagine the effects of pounding it through 4WD trails on a regular basis.

Toe is designed to preload the steering linkage to remove play in the system. You can visualize toe angle from above; toe-in, or positive toe, is displayed when the leading edges of the tires are closer together than in the rear. Toe-out, or negative toe, is when the leading edges are farther apart. Zero toe is when wheels are pointed straight ahead and are parallel to each other. A slight amount of positive toe is preferred for most vehicles.

Improper toe angle isn't the only reason a steering wheel won't center. This phenomenon can also be caused by the steering linkage not being centered when toe was adjusted in the first place. This can be corrected by recentering the steering wheel and readjusting toe to proper specs. A bent steering arm or linkage component can also cause the steering wheel to be off-center. I've also seen this occur due to loose steering arm bolts. An off-center steering wheel contributes to tire wear because as the wheels are turned off dead center they turn toe out and increase tire scrubbing.

Sometimes an off-center steering wheel is accompanied by a wheel pull to one direction or the other and could be the result of a damaged component somewhere in the vehicle - a bent axlehousing could be throwing off the rear toe setting (rear toe setting is often overlooked). A bent frame or overly worn suspension bushings can also be the cause. If your wheel is off-center and also pulling, it can be as simple as incorrect tire pressure from side to side. Memory steer is another effect that is usually associated with an off-center steering wheel. This is when the steering wheel returns to an off-center position and can result in steering pull or drift after completing a turn. This can be caused by binding in the steering linkage as well as power steering system issues such as leaks or improper hydraulic pressure. Steering linkage bind occurs when proper geometry is not maintained in lifted vehicles.

Many 4x4s don't have factory provisions for adjusting caster and camber and rear toe and camber, but the front toe setting is easily adjusted. Toe is controlled by the steering linkage. By loosening the adjusters on the tie rod and shortening or lengthening the tie rod by turning the ends, toe angle can be adjusted. This should not be a substitute for regular professional wheel alignment jobs and is simply a tip that can be used to put off frequent trips to the alignment shop due to regular trips to the trail.
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Before determining toe angle and/or performing adjustments, it's a good idea to start the engine and turn the steering wheel side to side to relieve pressure in the system. Then, turn the wheels straight and shut off the engine. You should also roll the vehicle back and forth a few times between measurements.

Get someone to hold the other end of the measuring tape and measure the leading toe distance. This is the distance between the leading edges of the front tires. You'll compare the results to the distance between the trailing edges of the tires directly opposite from where you took the first measurement.

The higher number will indicate toe direction: higher number in leading edge indicates toe out; higher number at trailing edge displays toe in. Larger-than-stock tires require more positive toe for best results.

Once the necessary measurements are performed to determine what the current toe setting is, you can loosen the bolts on the tie-rod adjuster sleeve so that the tie-rod ends can be rotated. Don't forgot to tighten the adjusters when you're done as damage or injury could result.

The tie-rod ends thread into the tie rod. The ends can be threaded in or out of the tie rod to make the assembly longer or shorter. Longer creates more toe out; shorter toe in. Don't make huge adjustments all at once. It's best to adjust and measure a few times to achieve appropriate setting.
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I hope this helps you if you were looking to do a toe alignment yourself if you have decent knowledge of component location on a jeep.

Jan 30, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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