Question about 1996 Chevrolet Corvette

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Diff noise noise in differential when at hiway speeds lite accel or decel, , backlash issue?

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I can understand on accel. and turning but decel I have never seen that I think it's possible tho. too much backlash would make sense

Posted on Sep 11, 2008

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How to replace front diff on 1989 dakota?


When? From neutral to R or D? May not need replacement at all.
There is a 'spider" gear package with shims to reduce backlash.
If you have no experience with differentials, this is one you should not tackle. You could be hurt. Badly. Be careful.

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Why does my 2006 Corvette rear end whine when decelerating from 68-60 and accelerating from 30-45?


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Chevy tahoe gear differential


remove the drain plugs from the diff units and check for metal bits. Check for metal in the transfer case oil as it sounds like a bearing in the diff section of the transfer case has failed.. There is a small diff here to allow the front wheels to travel at a different speed to the rear unit to allow for driving over un even surfaces or speed bumps.

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Intermittent backlash in drive train appears to be between transfer case to front diff in 4th gear on bitumen when centre diff lock engaged no more backlash. mainly occurs when at a constant speed ie 70 to...


you shouldnt be in 4 wheel drive on bitumen you will get "bind up" of drive train which can cause damage or excessive freeplay in other components in drive train, inspect freeplay in universal joints on tailshafts, centre bearing and diff backlash specs, some backlash is quite normal, inspect trans/transfer case mounts also.

Jan 22, 2011 | 2001 Toyota Land Cruiser

1 Answer

I have a 2000 outback wagon. I am getting a noise


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Jul 16, 2009 | 2000 Subaru Outback

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I just changed my rear end gears on my 2006 silverado had 323 when to 373 in hear a humming noise humming from thr rear but it dont do it all the time just some times could it be my tires my tires or about...


If noise was not there before the gear change I would say that the gear are not set up correctly. Have the shop or person that did the gear swap recheck the gear backlash and the pattern on the teeth.
Too much heal or toe on the gear mesh will cause a decel whine or an accel whine. May just need to reset the tolerances on the gears.May be best to have a reputable shop check and reset the gear backlash and pattern. This is not much af a DIY type project unless you are experienced at doing gear work.

Hope this helps

Apr 13, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

Want to install a posi unit in my 2004 Ram Quad 2WD 9.25


REMOVAL
  1. Remove filler plug from the differential cover.
  2. Remove differential cover and drain the lubricant.
  3. Clean housing cavity with flushing oil, light engine oil or a lint free cloth. NOTE: Do not use steam, kerosene or gasoline to clean the housing.
  4. Remove axle shafts.
  5. Remove RWAL/ABS sensor from housing. NOTE: Side play resulting from bearing races being loose on case hubs requires replacement of the differential case.
  6. Mark differential housing and bearing caps for installation reference (REFERENCE MARKS).
  7. Remove bearing threaded adjuster lock from each bearing cap.
  8. Loosen differential bearing cap bolts.
  9. Loosen differential bearing adjusters through the axle tubes with Wrench C-4164 (THREADED ADJUSTER TOOL).
  10. Hold differential case while removing bearing caps and adjusters.
  11. Remove differential case. NOTE: Tag the differential bearing cups and threaded adjusters to indicate their location.

INSTALLATION
  1. Apply a coating of hypoid gear lubricant to the differential bearings, bearing cups, and threaded adjusters. A dab of grease can be used to keep the adjusters in position.
  2. Install differential assembly into the housing.
  3. Install differential bearing caps in their original locations (BEARING CAPS).
  4. Install bearing cap bolts and tighten the upper bolts to 14 N·m (10 ft. lbs.). Tighten the lower bolts finger-tight until the bolt head is seated.
  5. Perform the differential bearing preload and adjustment procedure. NOTE: Be sure that all bearing cap bolts are tightened to their final torque of 136 N·m (100 ft.lbs.) before proceeding.
  6. Install axle shafts.
  7. Apply a bead of orange Mopar Axle RTV Sealant or equivalent to the housing cover (COVER SEALANT). CAUTION: If cover is not installed within 3 to 5 minutes, the cover must be cleaned and new RTV applied or adhesion quality will be compromised.
  8. Install the cover and any identification tag and tighten cover bolts to 41 N·m (30 ft. lbs.).
  9. Fill differential with lubricant to bottom of the fill plug hole. Refer to the Lubricant Specifications for the correct quantity and type. NOTE: Trac-lok™ differential equipped vehicles should be road tested by making 10 to 12 slow figure-eight turns. This maneuver will pump the lubricant through the clutch discs to eliminate a possible chatter noise complaint.
DIFFERENTIAL BEARING PRELOAD AND GEAR BACKLASH The following must be considered when adjusting bearing preload and gear backlash:
  • The maximum ring gear backlash variation is 0.076 mm (0.003 in.).
  • Mark the gears so the same teeth are meshed during all backlash measurements.
  • Maintain the torque while adjusting the bearing preload and ring gear backlash.
  • Excessive adjuster torque will introduce a high bearing load and cause premature bearing failure. Insufficient adjuster torque can result in excessive differential case free-play and ring gear noise.
  • Insufficient adjuster torque will not support the ring gear correctly and can cause excessive differential case free-play and ring gear noise.
NOTE: The differential bearing cups will not always immediately follow the threaded adjusters as they are moved during adjustment. To ensure accurate bearing cup responses to the adjustments:
  • Maintain the gear teeth engaged (meshed) as marked.
  • The bearings must be seated by rapidly rotating the pinion gear a half turn back and forth.
  • Do this five to ten times each time the threaded adjusters are adjusted.

  1. Through the axle tube use Wrench C-4164 to adjust each threaded adjuster inward until the differential bearing free-play is eliminated. Allow some ring gear backlash approximately 0.25 mm (0.01 in.) between the ring and pinion gear. Seat the bearing cups with the procedure described above.
  2. Install dial indicator and position the plunger against the drive side of a ring gear tooth (RING GEAR BACKLASH). Measure the backlash at 4 positions, 90 degrees apart around the ring gear. Locate and mark the area of minimum backlash.
  3. Rotate the ring gear to the position of the least backlash. Mark the gear so that all future backlash measurements will be taken with the same gear teeth meshed.
  4. Loosen the right-side, tighten the left-side threaded adjuster. Obtain backlash of 0.076 to 0.102 mm (0.003-0.004 in.) with each adjuster tightened to 14 N·m (10 ft. lbs.). Seat the bearing cups with the procedure described above.
  5. Tighten the differential bearing cap bolts 136 N·m (100 ft. lbs.).
  6. Tighten the right-side threaded adjuster to 102 N·m (75 ft. lbs.). Seat the bearing cups with the procedure described above. Continue to tighten the right-side adjuster and seat bearing cups until the torque remains constant at 102 N·m (75 ft. lbs.)
  7. Measure the ring gear backlash. The range of backlash is 0.15 to 0.203 mm (0.006 to 0.008 in.).
  8. Continue increasing the torque at the right-side threaded adjuster until the specified backlash is obtained. NOTE: The left-side threaded adjuster torque should have approximately 102 N·m (75 ft. lbs.). If the torque is considerably less, the complete adjustment procedure must be repeated.
  9. Tighten the left-side threaded adjuster until 102 N·m (75 ft. lbs.) torque is indicated. Seat the bearing rollers with the procedure described above. Do this until the torque remains constant.
  10. Install the threaded adjuster locks and tighten the lock screws to 10 N·m (90 in. lbs.).

Jan 14, 2009 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

1 Answer

Rear axle noise on accel and decel


it is gear noise.The style of this car you will hear a little noise because of how the rear end sits close to the driver and it is open behind you kinda makes an echo effect. probably getting play in the carrier side bearings allowing the gear to "walk" a little causing the pitch to change. this is usually the first cause of failure.You can just replace the bearings and set back up but might still get some noise if it has created a new wear pattern on gear set. This noise will not affect performance or how long it lasts.

Sep 10, 2008 | 1996 Chevrolet Corvette

2 Answers

91 tlc full time 4wd


Found this on internet for mine (can't remember where). Checking on serviceablity for ujoints etc to clarify but heard this from another mechanic one day.

The
noise you are describing is normal for landcruisers with some miles on
them. The noise is drivetrain backlash, while it may not be in
specification 100%, it is fine to continue driving.
Basically the backlash is all the "slack" that is in your system... starts in the transmission,
then you add in the driveshafts slack, them the rear differentials...
all of that combined equals slack that when you let off the gas "thumps
or clunks".
I believe that your driveshaft is not a rebuilable (checking on this)
type (no servicable u-joints=toyota thing) and replacing just that
probably would not be enough to make it go all away.
For 190k, again, this sounds very normal and will cause you no issues.
I hope this has helped, have a good dayAuto Tech Guy -- Friendly Toyota Tech. -- 100% Positive Feedback on 222 Toyota Accepts
Toyota Certified Technician, ASE Accredited, Engine rebuilder, Turbo specialist, Engine Diangnosis

Jul 22, 2008 | 1991 Toyota Land Cruiser

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