Question about 1997 Jeep Wrangler

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Check engine light keeps coming on with code for running lean. Ihad exhaust repaired thinking o2 sensor was bad but nope.New tailpipe is sooty also what do you think?1997 wrangler 4 cyl

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How the fuel pressure? regulator and fuel filter

Posted on Sep 10, 2008

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The check engine comes on but I dont lose power the code it is showing is sid 152.does anyone know what it is.


some codes dont cause power loss or may not even notice anything wrong but a check engine light a p0152 code means following answer courtesy of OBD-CODES.com === P0152 O2 Sensor (High Voltage) OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Article by Dale Dale Toalston ASE Certified Technician 02 Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What does that mean? The o2 (oxygen) sensors basically measure oxygen content in the exhaust. The PCM (powertrain control module) then uses this information to regulate fuel injector pulse. The o2 sensors are very important to proper operation of the engine. Problems with them can cause the PCM to add or take away too much fuel based on the faulty o2 sensor voltage. A P0152 code refers to the Bank 2, sensor 1, o2 sensor. (Bank 1 would contain cylinder 1 and bank 2 is the opposite bank. Bank 2 doesn't necessarily contain cylinder 2.) "Bank 2" refers to the side of the exhaust that DOES NOT contain cylinder number 1 and "Sensor 1" indicates that it is the pre-cat sensor, or forward(first) sensor on that bank. It is a four wire sensor. The PCM supplies a ground circuit and a reference voltage of about .5 volts on another circuit. Also for the o2 heater there is a battery voltage supply wire and another ground circuit for that. The o2 sensor heater allows the o2 sensor to warm up faster, thus achieving closed loop in less time than it would normally take for the exhaust to warm the sensor up to operating temperature. The O2 sensor varies the supplied reference voltage based on oxygen content in the exhaust. It is capable of varying from .1 to .9 volts, .1 indicating lean exhaust and .9 indicating rich exhaust. NOTE: A condensed explanation of fuel trims: If the o2 sensor indicates that the oxygen voltage reading is .9 volts or high, the PCM interprets this as a rich condition in the exhaust and as a result decreases the amount of fuel entering the engine by shortening injector "on time". The STFT (short term fuel trims) would reflect this change. The opposite would occur when the PCM sees a lean condition. The PCM would add fuel which would be indicated by a single digit positive STFT reading. On a normal engine the front o2 sensors switch rapidly back and forth two or three times per second and the STFT would shift positive and negative single digits to add and remove fuel to compensate at a similar rate. This little "dance" goes on to keep the air/fuel ratio at it's optimal level. Short term fuel trims or STFT reflect immediate changes in fuel injector "on-time" while long term fuel trims or LTFT reflect changes in fuel over a longer period of time. If your STFT or LTFT readings are in the positive double digits (ten or above), this indicates the fuel system has been adding an abnormal amount of fuel than is necessary to keep the proper air/fuel ratio. It may be overcompentsating for a vacuum leak or a stuck lean o2 sensor, etc. The opposite would be true if the fuel trim readings are in the negative double digits. It would indicate that the fuel system has been taking away excessive amounts of fuel, perhaps to compensate for leaking injectors or a stuck rich o2 sensor, etc. So when experiencing o2 related issues, reading your fuel trims can indicate what the PCM has been doing over the long term and short term with regard to fuel. This code indicates that the o2 sensor was stuck too high or in the rich position. The PCM monitors this voltage and if it determines that the voltage is too high out of range for too long, P0152 may set. Symptoms Symptoms may include: MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination Engine may run very rough Engine may be running lean or rich depending on if the o2 sensor is reading correctly or incorrectly Lack of power Increased fuel consumption Causes Potential causes of an P0152 code include: Bad bank 2, 1 o2 sensor incorrectly reading rich condition Engine running rich and o2 sensor Correctly reading rich condition Signal shorted to voltage in harness Wiring harness damage/melted due to contact with exhaust components Vacuum leak (make have lean codes (P0171, P0174) present with it) Leaking injectors Bad fuel pressure regulator Bad PCM Possible Solutions If you have any lean or rich codes associated with this code, focus on fixing these first because these can cause the o2 sensor voltage readings to appear to be faulty when they are in fact only reading correctly. So, with the engine running at operating temperature, use a scan tool to observe the Bank 2,1 o2 sensor voltage reading. Is it high? If so, look at the long term and short term fuel trim readings. The fuel trims are affected by the o2 sensors as noted above. If the LTFT reading for that bank is indicating negative double digits (PCM trying to take away fuel to compensate for problem) try inducing a vacuum leak to see if the sensor voltage then goes lean and the fuel trims increase. If the o2 sensor responds, suspect a problem with the engine, not the sensor. There may be other engine codes to help you. If the o2 sensor reading remains high (0.9 volts or above) and won't respond then shut off engine. With KOEO (Key on engine off) disconnect the o2 sensor and look for signs of corrosion or water intrustion. Repair as necessary. The voltage reading should now be about 0.5 volts. If so, replace the o2 sensor, it's shorted internally. If after unplugging the o2 sensor the voltage reading on the scan tool doesn't change, then suspect wiring problems. Inspect the harness and look for any melted wires or anywhere that the o2 sensor harness is making contact with the exhaust components. If you are unsure, you can check for continuity of all four wires between the sensor and the PCM with an ohmmeter. Any resistance at all indicates a problem. Repair as necessary.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0152
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

Jul 28, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

2005 BMW 325I CODE 171 174


It means too much O2 in the exhaust gas. It could be a leak between the engine and catalytic convertors in the exhaust pipes, bad sensors (they are in a very hot place and do go bad), bad catalytic convertors, and a few other problems. If you don't want to go to a qualified mechanic to find the exact reason, you can start with the cheapest repair and work your way up to the most expensive repair.
A reputable muffler repair shop is a good place to go since most of the causes for these codes are part of the exhaust

May 24, 2014 | 2000 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

I have a Pontiac torrent 2006 and I receive the ccodes P0442 small leak from and P0771 lean bank1,previously went to dealer they kept saying gas cap. I need help I think its the converter or oxygen sensor...


A p0442 code is solved by replacing the gas cap in most cases, especially if it is the original gas cap. As for the p0771 lean code, there are many issues that can cause this code, O2 sensor, small exhaust leak, spark plug or fuel injector issue, spark issue...the list goes on. This code will need a good understanding with diagnostic procedure and testing and a scan tool would help. You may get lucky with replacing the spark plugs and checking for an exhaust leak and repair the exhaust. A scanner will allow you to see what the engine management components are doing while the engine is running. Keep in mind, it may take several good trips to turn the check engine light off after repairs are made and codes are erased.

Apr 30, 2011 | 2006 Pontiac Torrent

1 Answer

Symptons o2 sensors


If your O2 sensors are malfunctioning, the main symptom would be that the Check Engine light will come on. On some vehicles, an O2 sensor circuit shorted to ground can cause a no-start problem.
If the "Check Engine" or "Service Engine Soon" light is on and there is a code for the O2 sensors, I would like to also advise you that many O2 sensor codes are not caused by the O2 sensors themselves. In many cases, the O2 sensors are only REPORTING the problem. for example, a code P0171 "Oxygen Sensor Lean" code is rarely ever caused by the O2 sensor. It is usually caused by a vacuum leak or a failed Mass Airflow sensor (MAF) or Manifold Absolute Pressure sensor (MAP) or a bad fuel injector. In these cases, repairing the real reason that the engine is running lean will fix the O2 Sensor code without replacing the O2 sensor.

Mar 12, 2011 | 2000 Chevrolet 3500

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My 05 sebring has the engine code p2098 the car has a 2.7 engine ,has had all 4 oxygen sensors replaced. the car will not stay running unless you keep your foot on the gas until it warms up. the engine cod...


The code p2098 is for a "lean" condition... Hold on a minute. An oxygen sensor cannot know if an engine is running lean it can only know there is oxygen remaining in the exhaust. The PERSON who wrote the code description assumes the engine does not have a mis-fire condition and that the exhaust system is intact.
Does the car run smooth? The fact that you have to keep the throttle open until it warms up makes me think not.
The car MUST run on all cylinders ALL THE TIME, and the exhaust system can have NO LEAKS upstream from the O2 sensor before the O2 sensor codes have any meaning.
These problems will cause the ECU to go full rich PRIOR to setting the code. Fouled spark plugs are a likely result. Also check the engine oil for the smell of gasoline. Full rich causes fuel to pass the piston rings and end up in the oil. If there is even the slightest hint of gas smell in the oil then change it.
If all of the above are true then act on the lean condition code by finding the culprit from this list:
  1. Vacuum leaks
  2. Low fuel pressure
  3. Bad injector
  4. Bad MAP and/or MAF
  5. Bad IAT

Mar 04, 2011 | Chrysler Sebring Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I cannot keep the check engine light off .changed the01 and 02 sensors on bank2. this is the code that keeps coming up.


it may be reading o2 sensor rich or lean which is not a o2 sensor problem , its reading discrepancies from the exhaust, it may be a bad plug or a leaking injector, its a sensor and its just on emissions leaving the engine and attempting to control fuel ratio and if it can't it gives off a flag that something is not right

Aug 14, 2010 | 1996 Chrysler Sebring

2 Answers

The exhaust pipes are very sooty and the mpg is


Most likely bad o2 sensors but you should have the engine management light on. If you have get the code read, then look it up on http//:www.bluejag.co.uk

Jul 12, 2010 | 2002 Jaguar X-Type

2 Answers

When the car is back firing, which oxegen sensor is bad


I have never seen an o2 sensor cause a car to backfire. sounds more like a timing issue rather then o2 sensors. why do you think there is a bad sensor? does it have any engine codes?

Jun 12, 2009 | 1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette

1 Answer

Codes p1153 -p1140 -p1133-p0174


P0174 Basically this means that an O2 sensor in bank 2 detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 2 is generally the side of the engine that doesn't have cylinder #1.
P0140 Basically this means the an O2 sensor in Bank 1 detected a lean condition, same as mentioned above. Bank 1 is the side where cylinder #1 is.
In the vast majority of cases, simply cleaning the MAF sensor does the trick. Consult your service manual for it's location if you need help. I find it's best to take it off and spray it with electronics cleaner or brake cleaner. Make sure you are careful not to damage the MAF sensor, and make sure it's dry before reinstalling.

P1133 and P1153 indicate that the HO25 Sensor has gone bad. There the O2 sensor to the left and right bank at the exhaust manifold. When the engine first start's the PCM runs on a open loop and ignores the O2 readings till it reaches it's operating temperature. Once the operating temperature has been reached the diagnostic will only run once per ignition cycle and if the PCM detects a lesser then specified value, a DTC of P1133 or P1153 will come up.
Once the problem has been repaired, after 3 start cycle will reset the MIL light. If the O2 is just dirty and slow to heat up try cycling the ignition start 3 times and the light should go off if the O2 sensor does not fail.
Try cleaning the MAF first and see if the light comes off after a few ignition cycle, If the service light is still on you can always have Auto Zone clear the DTC codes and see if it comes back which then check the left and right bank wire harness to the O2 sensors. 
Good luck and hope this helps, keep me posted.

May 25, 2009 | 1997 Oldsmobile Aurora

2 Answers

Check Engine Light - O2 Sensor - bank 1 running lean


you should have three oxygen sensors on your car, one for each bank of three cylinders; should be towards the Y pipe on each exhaust manifold. Additionally you should have one on the exhaust pipe before the cadilitic converter.

Nov 20, 2008 | 2002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

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