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3.1b) How to check and fix crankshaft position sensors How to check? If the CKP has died completely there will be very high resistance between the device's electrical connections associated with the open circuit. Furthermore spark delivery to the plugs will be absent. First check that the electrical connection is clean and secure; dirt or corrosion can impair an otherwise healthy CKP signal from getting through. If the CKP suffers from a drop in voltage associated with heat increase this can only be detectable with a voltmeter or oscilloscope with a graphical display; an analogue display voltmeter might just be able to show needle fluctuations due to voltage variation output. 2 pin socket (magnetic - sine wave output). One pin is 'ground' the other is 'signal'. A voltmeter set to 2 volts AC should measure a signal in the 0.2 to 2 volts range on the 'signal' pin. 3 pin socket (Hall effect, magneto - square wave form output).One pin is 'reference' (5volts), one pin is 'ground' and the third pin is 'signal'. A DC voltage should be detectable in the 0.5 to 1.5 volt range from the 'signal' pin. It is important that the voltage measurement take place at start up when the engine is cold and again, 20 minutes later, when the engine has fully warmed up to operating temperature. Often the voltage output from faulty sensors declines with temperature rise. How to fix? Check the wiring for continuity and that the electrical connection is clean and secure. Remove the CKP and clean off any dirt build up on the tip. If you strongly suspect the crank sensor as being at fault it is a relatively inexpensive device to replace. NEXT 3.2) CMP - Cam shaft position sensor

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was getting gas & spark & now no spark on any plugs


Crankshaft position sensor , possibly !
Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor
The crankshaft position (CKP) sensor is a three wire sensor based on the magneto resistive principle. A magneto resistive sensor uses two magnetic pickups between a permanent magnet. As an element such as a reluctor wheel passes the magnets the resulting change in the magnetic field is used by the sensor electronics to produce a digital output pulse. The PCM supplies a 12-volt, low reference, and signal circuit to the CKP sensor. The sensor returns a digital ON/OFF pulse 24 times per crankshaft revolution.
There are a lot of videos on youtube on testing crankshaft position sensors an Cam sensors !
There

Dec 18, 2015 | 2004 Chevrolet Tahoe

1 Answer

crank and cam sensor replaced . cars starts and run but still reads code 335 . cranksensor circuit malfunction. and idea whats the issue why this code is still coming up.?


the sensor may be good its the circuit code which means can be a wiring /connection problem not just the sensor the following link is courtesy of obd-codes.comP0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction What does that mean? The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set. Symptoms NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include: Vehicle may not start (see above) Vehicle may run rough or misfire MIL illumination Causes A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by: Damaged CKP sensor connector Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway) Sensor output open Sensor output shorted to ground Sensor output shorted to voltage Failed crank sensor Broken timing belt Failed PCM Possible Solutions Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs? If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay? If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault. This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335
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http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335

Aug 19, 2015 | 2005 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

What problems will code po335 cause


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

2005 CHYSLER CODE PO335 WHAT IS IT


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

it show code po385


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms:

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:

Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

Causes: A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
* Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
* If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
* If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
* If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 07, 2011 | 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue

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