Tip & How-To about Honda Civic

How to install a subwoofer and amplifier

When installing any electrical components always remember to unhook the battery. First thing you want to do is run your ground cable from a volt meter to a body or frame nut or bolt near by in the trunk or hatch area a shorter thicker ground is best then connect the other end of your volt meter to your battery cable that will need to be run through the firewall and connect to the positive battery terminal. Also VERY important make sure you have installed a fuse on the wire in between the amp and the battery. after you have connected the battery cable and ground to your meter it will light up or give you the correct reading for your ground, if not run the ground somewhere else until you have found the right spot. pull out your stereo, for stereos that are made to be compatible with an amp there will be multiple rca jacks in the back of the stereo. For a sub woofer you want to hook the rca cable to the rear or sub labeled rca jacks. Then run your amplifier remote wire to the remote wire protruding from the back of your car stereo. After that you can run the ground and battery cable to the correct slots. Now connect your sub via rca and your done. making it fit correctly is up to you. If you do not have an amp with a subwoofer out then you can take the wires from your sub and bridge the connection to your amp and get enough power, take the positive wire to your sub and hook it up to the positive terminal of channel one on the amp then take the negative wire from your sub and hook it into the negative terminal on channel two and your done.


























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charging ok new battry wont hold charge 4 more than 2 days


You can start by disconnecting the battery ground cable, connect a 12 volt test lamp between the cable and the battery post, If it lights up you have a short. and you'll need to start pulling fuses one at a time until the test lamp goes out. at that point you will know where to look for short.

Mar 13, 2011 | 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

my 1997 jeep grand cherokee tsi with a 5.2 seems to have a charging problem. the alternator is a year old and was tested twice in the last week at 2 different locations and was shown to be good. same thing with the battery. the problem is the voltage drops suddenly and it is the same symptoms as a dead alternator. this happens intermittently and will be fine for a week and then happen twice a day for a few days and then ok for 5 days. any ideas on what to check and how to determine if the part is bad. btw, i have cleaned and tightened all the connections around the battery, alternator and the ground on the body.


How is the pigtail ground strap from engine block to body? Have you had engine diagnostic test done? Voltage rVOLTAGE DROP TEST
A voltage drop test is the only effective way to find excessive resistance in high amperage circuits. It's a quick and easy test that doesn't require any disassembly and will quickly show you whether or not you've got a good connection or a bad one.
To do a voltage drop test, you create a load in the circuit that's being tested. Then you use a digital volt meter (DVM) to measure the voltage drop across the live connection while it is under the load. Voltage always follows the path of least resistance, so if the circuit or connection being tested has too much resistance some of the voltage will flow through the DVM and create a voltage reading.
voltage_drop.jpg

If a connection is good, you should find little or no voltage drop and see less than 0.4 volts for most connections, and ideally less than 0.1 volts. But if you find more than a few tenths of a voltage drop across a connection, it indicates excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or repair.
CHECKING THE STARTER CIRCUIT
To check the starter circuit for excessive resistance, you need to measure the voltage drop at the battery, battery cable connections and starter while the engine is being cranked.
The first check is "available battery voltage." For the starter to crank at normal speed, the battery must be at least 75% charged (12.4 volts or higher). Low battery voltage can not only affect the starter but every other electrical system in the vehicle.
A. Set your DVM to the 20 volt scale, then connect meter positive (+) lead to battery positive (+) post (not the clamp or cable), and the meter negative (-) lead to battery negative (-) post.
B. Disable the engine so it will not start when it is cranked. (Ground the ignition coil wire, or disable the ignition circuit or fuel pump relay.) Limit cranking time to 15 seconds or less.
C. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading on the DVM. D. Next, connect your meter positive (+) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter, and the meter negative (-) lead to the starter housing.
E. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading.
F. Compare the two voltage readings. If both are the same, there are no excessive voltage drops on the positive feed side.
G. If available voltage at the starter is not within one (1) volt of battery voltage, there is excessive voltage drop in the circuit.
The next test is for voltage drop on the positive side of the starter circuit.
A. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
B. Disable ignition.
C. Set DVM on 2 volt scale.
D. Connect meter positive (+) lead to positive (+) battery post, and the meter negative (-) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter. While cranking the engine, record the voltage reading.
The maximum allowable voltage drop including the solenoid or external relay in the starter circuit should be 0.6 volts or less.
If you find more than a 0.6 volt drop in the starter circuit, you can isolate the bad connection by using the following voltage drop tests.
* Check the positive battery post and cable connection by measuring the voltage drop between the two while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the battery post and the meter negative lead to the cable clamp. A good post/cable connection should have zero voltage drop.
* Check the positive battery cable by measuring the voltage drop end to end while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the clamp on the positive battery cable, and the meter negative lead to the end of the cable at the starter. Crank the engine and note the voltage reading. A good cable should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
* To check the starter solenoid or relay connections, connect the meter positive lead to positive battery terminal on the solenoid or relay, and the meter negative lead to the starter motor terminal. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
Next, you need to check the negative side of the starter circuit. To check the entire circuit, connect the meter positive lead to a clean spot on the starter motor case and the meter negative lead to the negative battery post. Crank the engine and note the reading. The voltage drop on the negative side should be 0.3 volts or less.
If the voltage drop is too high, set your DVM to the 2 volt scale and start checking each connection on the negative side to find the bad connection or cable. Use the DVM leads to check across each connection while cranking the engine as before.
Check the negative battery post/ground cable connection (should be zero voltage drop).
Check the negative ground cable from the battery to the engine (should be 0.2 volts or less).
Check between the negative battery post and starter housing (should be 0.3 volts or less).
Check between the engine block and starter housing (should be 0.10 volts or less).
CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT
To check the alternator connections on the positive side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect the meter positive lead to the alternator output stud (B+ terminal).
C. Connect the meter negative lead to the positive (+) battery post.
D. With the engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except the rear electric defroster), check the voltage drop reading. It should be 0.5 volts or less. If higher, the connections between the alternator output stud and battery need to be cleaned. Also, look for loose connections or undersized cables.
To check the alternator connections on the negative side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect meter negative lead to alternator case.
C. Connect meter positive lead to battery negative (-) post.
D. With engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except rear defogger), check the voltage drop reading. On the negative side, it should be 0.2 volts or less. If excessive, the connections need cleaning or the negative cable needs to be replaced. Some alternators are mounted in rubber bushings and have a separate ground strap. If so equipped, be sure to check the voltage drop across this strap, too.

egulator checked with voltmeter?

Nov 15, 2009 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

I have an electrical problem. When unhook my negative clamp form battery i can get 12 volts from my negative post to a body ground. So I have a short somewhere. Where would it be.


IF YOU UNHOOK THE NEGATIVE CLAMP FROM THE BATTERY AND YOU STILL GET A READING FROM NEGATIVE POST ON THE BATTERY TO THE FRAME YOUR METER IS COMPLETING THE 12 VOLT CIRCUIT AND THAT IS WHY YOUR READING 12 VOLTS ON YOUR METER. SOME BATTERY CABLES HAVE A SECOND GROUND FROM THE CABLE TO THE FRAME BUT IS CONNECTED AT THE BATTERY POST SUCH AS A FUSEABLE LINK WHEN YOU DISCONNECT THE CABLE YOU DISCONNECT THE GROUND. IF YOU HAD A SHORT AND READ 12 VOLTS THRU THE GROUND YOU WOULD DEFINETLY SEE SMOKE

Sep 26, 2009 | 2005 Mercury Mountaineer

1 Answer

Trying to install narva driving lamps unit has


In 12 volt DC automotive electrical systems black is always the ground wire or negative. Make sure you disconnect the battery before doing any electrical work (unhook the negative cable first). Don't splice into any wires under the dash, use a piggyback fuse connector on one of the accessory fuses eg; cigarette lighter.

Sep 20, 2009 | 2008 Toyota RAV4

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