Tip & How-To about Toyota Pickup

How to save fuel and make your vehicle last longer, too

Improving fuel economy is easy - just take it easy. It willmake your vehicle last longer, too. Here are some specific tips on how to savemoney on both fuel and repairs.

  • Keep your tires inflated at the correct pressure. Under-inflation causes tire wear and wastes fuel.
  • Do not carry unneeded weight in your vehicle. Excess weight puts a heavier load on the engine, causing greater fuel consumption.
  • Avoid lengthy warm-up idling. Once the engine is running smoothly, begin driving - but gently. Remember, however, that on cold winder days this may take a little longer.
  • Keep automatic transmission selector lever into "D" when engine breaking is not required. Driver with the selector lever in "4" will reduce the fuel economy. (This is referring to vehicles with Automatic drive)
  • Accelerate slowly and smoothly. Avoid jackrabbit starts. Get into the high gear as quickly as possible.
  • Avoid long engine idling. If your have a long wait and you are not in traffic, it is better to turn off the engine and start again later.
  • Avoid engine lugging or over-reversing. Use a gear position suitable for the road on which you are traveling.
  • Avoid continuous speeding up and slowing down. Stop-and-go driving wastes fuel.
  • Avoid unnecessary stopping and braking. Maintain a steady pace. Try to time the traffic signals so you only need to stop as little as possible or take advantage of through streets to avoid traffic lights. Keep a proper distance from other vehicle to avoid sudden breaking. This will also reduce wear on your breaks.
  • Avoid heaving traffic or traffic jams whenever possible.
  • Do not rest your foot on the clutch or break pedal. This causes premature wear, overheating and poor fuel economy.
  • Maintain a moderate speed on high ways. The faster you drive, the greater the fuel consumption. By reducing your speed, you will cut down on fuel consumption.
  • Keep the front wheels in proper alignment. Avoid hitting the curb and slow on rough roads. Improper alignment not only causes faster tire wear, but also puts an extra load on the engine, which, in turn, wastes fuel.
  • Keep the bottom of your vehicle free from mud, etc. This not only lessens weight but also helps prevent corrosion.
  • Keep your vehicle tuned-up and in top shape. A dirty air cleaner, carburetor out of adjustment, improper valve clearance, dirty plugs, dirty oil and grease, breaks not adjusted, etc. all lower engine performance and contribute to poor fuel economy. For longer life of all parts and lower operating costs, keep all maintenance work on schedule, and if you often drive under severe conditions, see that your vehicle receives more frequent maintenance.
Good luck.

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How do I get decent gas mileage?


To put it as simple as I can --the faster you go the more fuel you use-- Not rocket science really.-- At the recommended speed the vehicle is in the optimal torque range and is returning the best economy for that speed . any thing over and it takes a big nose dive.. At the recommended speed you have maximum control of the vehicle and it will last the longest time . Now you have to improve the economy by paying attention to the following items
Tyre width , size pressure is critical to economy
Loads being carried at speed is critical to economy
Add-ons such as load racks add to fuel usage so take them off.
Fast take offs at lights uses fuel. If you let the engine bog down instead of changing gears will use fuel.
Not using the cruise control uses more fuel as every time you alter the accelerator pedal position that is extra fuel being used.
Using E fuel mixes will lower economy. So economy is a matter of your driving habits and not of the make of vehicle.
If you want better economy at the speed syou travel at then visit a speed shop and have the CPU re-chipped for more power at the higher rpm's but be aware that it may void your warranty on the vehicle.

Aug 14, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I want to replace the standard spark plug of my 1995 2.0 Honda Accord to Iridium Spark Plug. What is the specs of the Iridium Spark Plug will I buy? Does this help in improving the engine performance? in terms of fuel economy? improving torque? speed? Do I have to replace also the High Tension Wire? Thank you very much?


I've never found there to be any performance differences for the Accord using copper core plugs versus iridium. The iridium plugs cost substantially more, but last longer. They are more reliable.

However, if you are looking for such things as better performance, then the best potential rests on the copper core type. If you've modified the car such as added a turbo or supercharger, copper plugs are best. The reason for that is that copper core plugs have a lower heat range than iridium. Heat range is in reference to how quickly the electrode cools after the spark has fired. Copper dissipates heat faster than iridium. In your cylinder you want the only fuel ignition source to be the spark and never anything else...such as the end of a spark plug that is still hot enough to ignite your fuel without the spark plug firing. A copper plug is least likely to do this.

Mar 19, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

2 Answers

how do I improve my fuel economy in my 1997 Hyundai Sonata GLS?


Here are some tips on how to improve your fuel economy:
- Going fast is so tempting. Not only do we do it to keep up with the flow of traffic, but if we can save even five minutes, it seems worth it. But if you're on the highway, driving 60 miles per hour instead of 70 mph will save you 2-4 miles per gallon over the duration of your trip.
- Take it easy on the throttle. Don't accelerate quickly or stomp on the brakes. Coast to a stop. You'll save on fuel as well as wear and tear on your brakes, which will save you even more money.
- Shut down. If you're waiting somewhere for a while, like at a train crossing for instance, turn off your engine. Even if it's just for a minute, it can make a difference in your fuel economy, especially if you drive in the city a lot.
- Don't warm up your vehicle for more than 30 seconds. This is a tough one, especially for us here at Consumer GuideĀ®, where Chicago's frigid winters are a way of life. Thanks to technology, however, most modern fuel-injected cars only really need 30 seconds to warm, and hot air can start blasting into the cabin very shortly thereafter.
- Windows up. Again, this is tough, especially on pleasant days. But having the windows down creates aerodynamic drag that causes an engine to work harder. On the highway, this can decrease fuel economy by up to 10 percent.
- Check your tire pressure. Making sure your vehicle's tires are set to the recommended pressure can increase fuel economy by as much as 3.3 percent.
- Breathe easy. Next time you get your oil changed, have the air filter checked as well. Replacing a dirty air filter with a clean one can save up to 10 percent on fuel costs.
- Make sure your vehicle is in top running order. Read your owner's manual and follow the manufacturer's recommended maintenance schedule. If it's time for a tune up, do it and you can realize up to a 4.1 percent increase in fuel economy.
- Buy the right gas. Your owner's manual will list the correct octane gasoline you should use for your vehicle. Purchase whatever is recommended and no more. Premium-grade fuel is more costly and won't improve economy in vehicles designed to run on regular.
- Lighten up. The less weight in your vehicle, the better your fuel economy. Clean out that trunk!
- Grease up. Using the manufacturer's specified motor oil, and changing it per factory recommendations, can improve fuel economy as well.
- Combine trips. Don't run out two or three times a day. Hit all the stores you need to visit at once, and if possible, go to shopping malls where you can park and walk to several stores at the same time.
- Cool down. Gas up on cool mornings. Fuel is denser when cold. Gas pumps measure by volume, so if you pump when it's cold, you get more gas for your buck.

Dec 12, 2010 | 1997 Hyundai Sonata

1 Answer

104,000 miles GMC Jimmy 4x4 with power everything looking to buy for second car, any major things i should look out for , is it a good car to have


They're decent vehicles. If all has been taken care of, the transmission should last until around 200,000 mi, and that's usually the first major thing to go. Sometimes the fuel pump needs replaced around this time, so expect that one to come up if it hasn't already been replaced. On occasion as well, ball joints are getting close to replacing, but that's a pretty easy job. Otherwise, you should be able to settle in for a while and enjoy your vehicle. Also, fuel economy isn't the greatest....don't expect to get more than 21 mpg on the highway. (the 4.3 V-6 isn't known for it's economy.) The parts are cheap, and the trucks last. Hope this helps.

Oct 29, 2009 | 2000 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

I usually get 30-32 mpg and now I am getting 27. Why?


Has there been any changes to your vehicle in the last few weeks that you can recall. Regular oil changes are a must. Also, check the air pressure in your tires every once in awhile. These two things are key to keeping your car running good and getting better gas mileage. Your tires will also last longer if they are at the propper PSI. Also, do you travel the same route every day or does it change. Highway driving and city driving have a big difference in the average fuel economy your vehicle is going to get.

Aug 05, 2009 | 1996 Ford Explorer

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