Tip & How-To about Chrysler Sebring

When should I change the timing belt on my car?

The philosophy "if ain't broke do not fix", doesn't work for the timing belt. If it broke, then can bend valves and put a hole in the piston. Normally the engine repair cost much more than a timing belt change. Worn timing chain/belt can cause engine to run rough, decrease the power, and fuel mileage, and even worse, the engine refuses to run at all. It is difficult to check the wear on a timing belt, because access difficulties, so plan to change the belt at recommended intervals. As a rule, most OEM recommend replacing OHC rubber timing belts at 60Kmiles, but there are exceptions. Porsche, Volvo recommends belt replacement at 50K up to 100K depending on engine models. Acura, Audi and Chrysler allow 90K between belt changes. Ford, Mercury and Toyota up to 100K, but not for all engines. Changes in belt materials have improved belt durability to 100K, where "long life" materials are used, as "highly-saturated-nitrile" (HSN).
Timing chains usually gives some warning signs before they fail (but not with belts). Noise from inside the timing chain cover indicates that it is overstretched. You can check the status of a timing chain by removing the distributor cap and turn the crank shaft pulley in one direction (VERY SLOWLY) until distributor rotor moves, mark with a chalk crank shaft pulley to engine. Now turn it in the opposite direction (VERY SLOWLY) until the distributor rotor starts to move the other way. If the crank pulley has to be turned more than half an inch to move rotor, the timing chain and sprockets, are worn up, and have to be replaced.
While changing the timing chain/belt, it is easily accessible for other jobs, such a water pump replacement, so it is a good idea to replace other belts, and the water pump. Make sure to send your car to professionals. It is not rare for people to have problems with engine after replacing the timing belt. In all my cars I do it by myself. It is not impossible, but you will spend more time than a professional. If you decide to do it by yourself, then get the Haynes Repair Manual (Based on a complete tear down and rebuilt), specific for your car. Go to the part Engine, and use the chapter Timing belt removal inspection, and Top Dead Center (TDC) location, and put the number one piston at TDC on the compression stroke. This can be found by putting the thumb over the spark plug hole and the pressure will push your finger upward till piston reaches the upper point. This can be done by inserting a long blunt object into the spark plug hole. Note the point where the object stops moving out this is the TDC.
YOU MUST ALIGN TIMING MARKS BEFORE REMOVING TIMING BELT.


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and after i fixed the timing belt it started to vibrating and what is the problem now?


I know it's a pain go back and pull the cover and make sure the timing marks are perfect. The belt should have been changed about 60,000 miles. If you changed the belt because it broke or jumped timing the valves hit the pistons bending the valves and or putting a hole in the piston or pistons. From what I read the Honda engines are interference engines so if the engine was running or you went to turn the engine to line up the marks you could have bent a valve. Hopefully you are just one tooth off. If this helps please rate it. If you have more questions let me know

Dec 27, 2011 | 1991 Honda Accord

2 Answers

timing belt broke and i need to set the timing


The pistons, valves and cylinder walls typically take a beating when the timing belt breaks. If yours didn't, I'm amazed.

But you can TRY this:
For most OHV engines with a timing belt there is usually a hole in the camshaft sprocket that can align with a hole in the head. If there are two camshafts, each sprocket typically has the same arrangement. Look closely, if there is no hole, there will be a mark of some kind to indicate #1 Top Dead Center.
Make certain that the crankshaft and the camshaft(s) are all at #1 TDC, if there are holes in the sprocket(s), push an appropriately sized drill bit through the hole, into the corresponding hole in the head to hold the camshaft timing, then replace the belt, making certain that any idler pulleys or tension adjuster pulleys are out of the way. After you've put the new belt on, Put the idler pulleys and tension adjusters back into their appropriate place then remove whatever you used to hold the pulleys in place.
Most of the time a valve will "kiss" a piston when the timing belt breaks. That causes immediate and fatal damage to the engine requiring (at minimum) a complete engine rebuild. Sometimes valve seats, pistons, cylinder walls and other components are destroyed when the piston and valve collide.

Feb 27, 2011 | 1992 Honda Accord

1 Answer

How do I tighten my timing belt on my 1987 honda accord lxi with a fuel injected A20A1 motor. I started the car and it was loose but not super loose, I want to tighten it for safety so let me know if you know how to tighten it. I also dont know how or where the marks are and are suppost to line up at. Thanks


The philosophy "if ain't broke do not fix", doesn't work for the timing belt. If it broke the overhead cam stops, but the crank shaft keeps moving, and the result is one or more bent valve. Normally the repair cost is ten times more, than a timing belt change. The timing belt cannot be tighten up, it must be replaced with a new one. The manual recommend to change the timing belt at 90000miles. It is a good idea to replace other belts, and the water pump. Make sure to send your car to professionals. It is not rare for people to have problems with engine after replacing the timing belt. In all my cars I do it by myself. It is not impossible, but you will spend more time than a professional. If you decide to do it by yourself, then get the Haynes Repair Manual (Based on a complete tear down and rebuilt), specific for your car. I have one for each of my cars. Go to the part Engine, and use the chapter Timing belt removal inspection, and Top Dead Center (TDC) location, and put the number one piston at TDC on the compression stroke. This can be found by putting the thumb over the spark plug hole and the pressure will push your finger upward till piston reaches the upper point. This can be done by inserting a long blunt object into the spark plug hole. Note the point where the object stops moving out this is the TDC. Hope this will help.

Oct 24, 2010 | 1987 Honda Accord

1 Answer

when should i change the timing belt on a 2002 chrysler sebring sedan?


The philosophy "if ain't broke do not fix", doesn't work for the timing belt. If it broke the overhead cam stops, but the crank shaft keeps moving, and the result is one or more bent valve. Normally the repair cost is ten times more, than a timing belt change. The manual recommend to change the timing belt at 90000miles. It is a good idea to replace other belts, and the water pump. Make sure to send your car to professionals. It is not rare for people to have problems with engine after replacing the timing belt. In all my cars I do it by myself. It is not impossible, but you will spend more time than a professional. If you decide to do it by yourself, then get the Haynes Repair Manual (Based on a complete tear down and rebuilt), specific for your car. I have one for each of my cars. Go to the part Engine, and use the chapter Timing belt removal inspection, and Top Dead Center (TDC) location, and put the number one piston at TDC on the compression stroke. This can be found by putting the thumb over the spark plug hole and the pressure will push your finger upward till piston reaches the upper point. This can be done by inserting a long blunt object into the spark plug hole. Note the point where the object stops moving out this is the TDC. Hope this will help.

Oct 19, 2010 | 2002 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

I have a '93 Acclaim with the Mitsubishi 3.0L V6. The car has 115,000 miles on it. The original timing belt (and water pump) were replaced at 60,000 miles. A repair shop just told me the engine was 'toast' because of a timing belt slip. They said the slip caused the pistons and valves to collide, bending the valves and damaging the pistons. Everything I've read says this is a 'zero interference' engine - one in which a timing belt failure or slippage is not capable of producing a situation where the pistons could hit the valves. I'm suspicious because the same shop has offered to buy the car from me for a trifling sum.


GOOD IF YOU COULD FIX IT YOUR SELF.OR TAKE IT TO ANOTHER MECHANIC.IF YOU COULD FIX TIMING BELT THEN DO A COMPRESSION AND A CYLINDER LEAK DOWN TEST AT EACH CYLINER WITH CLOSED VALVES.VALVE COVERS NEEDS TO BE OFF BEFORE YOU CAN SEE VALVE CLOSED POSITION.IF AIR BLEEDS MORE THAN 40% YOU HAVE BENT VALVES YOU WILL HEAR AIR GUSH AT INTAKE OR OUT EXHAUST PIPES.YOU KNOW VALVES BEEN.I REMEMBER I HAD 1977 CHEVY MONZA TIMING BELT BROKE.BY GOOD LUCK AND GODS WILL DIDNT DAMAGE VALVES NOR PISTONS PUT NEW TIMING BELT ON ENGINE RAN FINE.WHEN MY TIMING BELT BROKE ALL MY PISTONS WAS MIDWAY OF THE ENGINE.THAT SAVE MY VALVES AND PISTON. LIKE I SAY DO BOTH TEST FIRST THEN YOU WILL KNOW IF ENGINE DAMAGED.

Oct 02, 2010 | 1993 Plymouth Acclaim

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