Tip & How-To about 2005 Audi A3

Gas Saving

It came with your Audi for a reason. Use it on those longer drives at both high or lower speeds. Most times it will save you money on fuel, but there are times when it won’t. On hills and uphill grades cruise control can burn more fuel and rob you of the benefits of this modern marvel. That’s because on a hill cruise control will kick in to keep your speed perfect, making your engine work harder and burn more fuel in the process. With all the flat ground we have in South Florida we don't have too much to be concerned about in this regard, but do pay attention to those overpasses and large bridges.

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Does the driving on overdrive mode cause high fuel consumption, because the transmission use the first three ratios mostly?


driving in over drive mode actually is what gives the economy as the engine rpms will be around 300 less than direct drive . Lower rpms = fuel savings
OD should come in around 60 klm/hr and drop out at around 50 klm/hr. When you are accelerating hold the pedal in a set position and watch the rev counter (rpms ) and each gear change you will see the rpms drop and then build back up as the vehicle speed increases At 100klm/hr the revs should be around 3200 rpms or less but if over ( say 3500 rpms) then may be the OD is not coming in. One way to test a box operation is to find a speed shop with a dynomometer and test the gear selections against loads and engine rpms

Dec 23, 2014 | 2000 Audi A6

2 Answers

Does the driving on overdrive mode cause high fuel consumption, because the transmission use the first three ratios mostly?


Driving in overdrive, say on a trip where your speeds are over 65 to 70..Actually saves gas, but using overdrive to drive around town not only uses more gas, but can cause damage to your transmission.

Dec 23, 2014 | 2000 Audi A6

2 Answers

Can wheels and tires affect gas mileage?


Well braking will drastically reduce your fuel economy, as of course this is taking the inertia energy of the vehicle which you built burning fuel in the engine and then reducing that and changing that inertia into heat.Your tyres do pretty much the same thing as they are a trade off between low rolling resistance and grip which helps you turn and brake. The reason trains have steel wheels is because they turn on tracks, although their braking distance is severely affected. You need to stop quickly in a car and corner safely enough to not end up in a ditch each time you take a corner, and this is why you have high grip rubber tyres on your vehicle.Typically the best way to reduce rolling resistance with your present set of tyres, is to keep them inflated up to pressure, or even slightly over pressure, which most vehicles can afford to do. (arround 5 P.S.I. will do)Other fuel saving techniques which can drastically improve performance are:
1) Remove excess weight such as the spare wheel, jack, wrench etc. Carry a can of tyre sealant instead for minor emergencies.
2) Remove any excess baggage which doesn't need to make permanent home in your car.
3) Remove any unused bike racks, roof racks and spoilers from the car.
4) When driving keep plenty of room between yourself and the car in front. This allows you to use lighter braking force when cruising at speed and also allows you to get off the gas earlier when stopping.The same goes for looking well ahead in the road for red traffic lights or stop signs. Get off the gas early if you are going to be stopping up ahead anyway!
5) Best fuel saving tip overall; plan your route ahead of time. If it's a route you are unfamiliar with then driving around in circles trying to find it is not going to save any fuel at all. Planning ahead and travelling during low traffic volume periods can save a huge quantity of fuel.

6) Share your supermarket/shopping mall trip with a neighbor or friend. You can share the cost of fuel and reduce the number of vehicles on the road at the same time.


7) Manage several errands in one long trip. Cars by far use the most fuel on cold start and during cold running, as well as suffer around 80% of engine wear during cold start only. By keeping your car up to temperature on a longer journey, you can improve your average fuel economy and reduce wear and tear to the engine internals.


8) When accelerating up to cruising speed, use around 75% of the available engine power. Only reserve this method for times when there is little traffic ahead and you can maintain safe braking distances ahead. Getting up to speed more quickly actually saves fuel in the long run. I really don't mean burn the rubber off the wheels and burn your clutch out kind of acceleration though, so take it easy!

Oct 30, 2012 | 2007 Cadillac Escalade Two-Wheel Drive

1 Answer

idling to high


Hi jmach,

There is nothing wrong with your vehicle and no need to have anything repaired.... The high idle speed is controlled by the on board ECU...(the Electronic Control Unit).... When starting the vehicle from cold, the automatic enrichment of fuel increases the idle speed... Depending on the ambient air temperature.... the colder the weather, the longer the engine will take longer to return to normal idle speed. Thats how it's designed to operate.

Regards Johngee10

Jul 12, 2008 | 2004 Toyota Matrix

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