Tip & How-To about Mercedes-Benz C230

How to Wire On-Board Marine Battery Chargers

Battery chargers are wired into a boat's electrical system. Wiring the charger to a battery switch permits the charging of the individual batteries or battery banks. The switch can be configured to charge both batteries or battery banks at once. Mounting the charger in the vessel keeps the charger where it will do the most good--connected to the batteries. This is useful if you are stuck with low batteries and need a recharge. Power from a generator, shore power or even AC power from another vessel can be used to get you going again

Instructions Things You'll Need:
Battery charger
Battery switch
Battery cable (sized)
Cable cutters
Razor knife
Battery terminal lugs
Lug crimper
Terminal kit
Terminal crimper
Hammer
Step 1

Mount the battery switch with the mounting kit provided by the manufacturer. The switch should be accessible but close to the battery or battery banks.
Step 2
Mount the battery charger in a location that will be accessible but protected from the elements. Mount the charger close to the battery switch to reduce the size of the charger leads.
Step 3
Connect the battery cables to the battery switch. Mount the battery cables onto their corresponding terminal studs on the battery switch.
Step 4
Lay out the battery positive cable from the charger to the switch and cut it to length with the cable cutters. Strip 3/4 inch of insulation from the cable ends with a razor knife. Splice the cable to the hot wire from the charger with a **** connector and the terminal crimper. Crimp a terminal lug onto the battery end of the cable with the lug crimper and a hammer. Connect the terminal lug at the battery switch positive output terminal.
Step 5
Lay out a battery cable from the charger to the battery negative terminal block. Cut the cable to length and strip 3/4 inch of insulation from the ends with a razor knife. Connect the battery negative cable to the charger negative power lead with a ****-splice and the terminal crimpers. Crimp a terminal lug onto the terminal block end of the cable with the lug crimper and a hammer. Connect the terminal lug at the battery negative terminal block post.

Tips & Warnings
Set the switch to "1," "2" or "both" to charge battery bank 1, bank 2 or both batteries at once.

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I have a 1985 RV Ford Econoline w/ a 460 eng.,but my problem is electrical,possibly the solenoid,which we replaced.I deduce that the solenoid could be bad,or the wrong one,because the Onan generator will not start,and the onboard battery charger will not charge the generator battery,which is also on the driver's side of the R.V..Any ideas or possible clues would be appreciated very much.I cannot afford an R.V.shop,and my shade tree friend is suggesting straight wiring the generator,but I am trying to avoid that if possible.I need some help with this bottomless pit money hole.Thanks fellows.


check and make sure all batterys are good make sure alt. out put is 12.9 to 14 volts make sure charging cable from front to generator battery is working if it has a seperate charging system for generator battery or batterys,check and make sure charger is working properly if not replace charger or run no. 8 wire from front charging system to gen. battery make sure main engine is running while you start gen. after gen starts turn engine off

Aug 16, 2013 | 1988 Ford Econoline

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mcb triping in caravan.


Yes it is probably the charger. If the system works with just the battery in the circuit, it would eliminate the majority of the wiring. The problem could still be wiring, but between the charger and the battery. Check all the connections before you go changing anything.

May 06, 2013 | 1997 Dodge Caravan

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RV Auxillary battery overcharges


cut a switch between this battery and the charge system

Oct 10, 2009 | 1991 Chevrolet C3500

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Try to isolate the problem. If the current flow is between the fuse block and the window switch you may be grounding somewhere between. Next check the window switch. If there is current flow across the switch when not being used, replace the switch. There should be no current at the window motor until the switch is engaged. On the other hand, you could just buy one of those solar powered battery chargers for about $40 to keep the battery up and not worry about it until something fails.

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