Tip & How-To about 2004 Honda Pilot

2004 Pilot timing belt replacement


(for the 105,000 mile timing belt service)

Part List :
-Timing belt: 14400-P8A-A02
-Adjuster automatic (hydraulic tensioner): 14520-P8E-A01
-Adjuster - timing belt: 14510-PGE-A01
-Idler pulley - timing belt: 14550-P8A-A01 (OR) 14550-PGE-A01 (there are 2 numbers listed)
-Alternator/Compressor belt: 38920-P8F-A02
-Power steering belt: 56992-P8A-A01
-O-RING (8.8X1.9): 91302-GE0-000
-Fender trip clips (X7): 91501-S04-003

Special Tools Needed:
Honda Crankshaft Pulley Removal Tool
3/4" breaker bar

Procedure:
-Remove tire and place the Pilot on a jack stand.

-Remove the clips holding the fender liner and lower splash shield in place (x7) and fold them out of the way.

-Make sure the #1 piston is on top dead center using the marks on the crank pulley and lower timing belt cover (19mm in the crank pulley).

-Remove the Alternator-Compressor belt (14mm boxend) & Power Steering belt. (2-12mm and 1-12mm tensioner bolt)

-Loosen the crank pulley. If you have an impact wrench or a long breaker bar it makes it easier to remove the bolt. You will also need a special tool crankshaft pulley holder (50mm) (19mm and special tool).

-Remove the side engine mount bracket (5-14mm bolts).

-Remove the crankshaft pulley.

-Remove the oil dipstick & tube (10mm).

-Remove the front & rear 'upper covers' of the timing belt housing, moving the wire harness out of the way first (5-10mm bolts for each cover).

-Remove the lower cover (7-10mm bolts).

-Remove the engine mount bracket that is bolted to the block (3-14mm bolts).

-Remove the hydraulic tensioner (2-10mm bolts).

-Remove the tensioner pulley (you will reuse the inner sleave) (14mm bolt).

-Remove the idler pulley bolt (14mm bolt with thread locker on it) (I used Loctite 242 during the reinstall because I had it on the shelf).

-Remove the timing belt.

-Before installing a new timing belt, make sure the pulleys, belt guide plate, upper & lower covers are clean and check to see if the crank and cams have rotated (mine did not move).

-The install is the reverse order of removal (make sure you torque everything correctly!)

-The removal of the lock pin in the hydraulic tensioner gave me a little trouble so I used pliers.

-Once the crank pulley is back on, check the lower timing mark (and the cam marks) before the top covers are installed.

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1 Answer

tensioning timing belt


Timing belts usually have an automatic (spring Loaded) adjuster. Usual replacement is done at 100,000 k or 60,000 miles. If you do not replace it you run the risk of it breaking which could do damage to the engine. refer to your owners manual.

Aug 30, 2014 | 1999 Holden Vectra

1 Answer

How do I adjust the timing belt on an 02' chevy


It should have an automatic adjuster such as a spring loaded idler pulley or a hydraulic tensioner

Jun 02, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

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When should the timing belt be changed on the 2.5L engine in my 1998 Chrsyler Sebring JXI Convertible? An independent service garage recommends replacing it at 100,000 miles; owner's manual doesn't list timing belt change for this model but does call for changing it at 105,000 for the 2.4L engine.


personnally i recommend a belt change at 60,000,the reason is,i have, like many others, have had a belt snap,and the makers do not pay the bill.maybe to some as excesive,but have you seen the bill for a new head etc....?

Sep 23, 2010 | 1998 Chrysler Sebring

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When should I replace the timing belt? How would I know if it needs changing?


2005 Dodge Neon has 105,000 miles on it and needed the timing belt changed. This is not an easy task and you will find it takes about 6-8 hours if you have all the needed parts ready to install if you need them.
Before you start this job: 1. Inspect the upper and lower torque struts that hold the motor on the passenger side. Order them ahead of time if you see they are damaged. Make sure the local parts store has them in stock if you are not sure of their integrity. You can tell if they are bad when you remove them; they just fall apart or you can see the split neoprene. 2. Inspect your accessory belts and the serpentine tensioner pulley prior to beginning the work. Order the belts (If you have over 75,000 miles on the vehicle, you will need the new accessory belts.) or know where you can purchase them locally. 3. Make sure you can get a new timing belt tensioner unit locally at your Mopar Dealer. If you have a mechanical timing belt tensioner, you are warned by a Dodge technical bulletin to replace it with a hydraulic unit. 4. Order a water pump and replace it while replacing the timing belt.
First, it was necessary to remove the passenger side tire and the splash guard behind the tire in the wheel well. The next items to remove were the accessories belts (ac, alternator, etc.) which included the serpentine belt. The crankshaft damper had to be removed with a three-arm puller tool and a small insert that protects the crankshaft threads.
Remove the power steering pump by just setting it off to the side after removing the bolts. You don't have to undo the hoses; just lay it over to the side.
Using a floor jack, you hold the engine in place while you remove the lower torque arms. Inspect the upper and lower torque arms carefully as mine needed replaced. I was very lucky that a local parts store had the lower torque arm at their warehouse; I ordered the upper torque arm as I could easily see it was broken. I would at least inspect these torque arms carefully for broken neoprene prior to beginning the timing belt change; the engine could have fallen off the lower torque arm if I had hit a huge bump while driving. When I took the upper torque arm loose, the engine shifted on the floor jack and the lower torque arm neoprene completely separated, allowing the engine to shift off the arm. The lower torque arm is about 2' long and made of aluminum with neoprene inserts for the engine to ride more smoothly on when hitting bumps. You must also remove the upper torque arm on the engine passenger side about 12" in length; that was also broken on my car and had to be replaced. The torque arms were about $112 for both.
Next, you must remove the serpentine tensioner plate which has three bolts; I think. This was a totally unexpected cost for my timing belt replacement when I tried to purchase only the plastic tensioner pulley and was informed that the item was not a replacement part; you had to go to Dodge and purchase an entire plate (with a redesigned "hydraulic" tensioner for the serpentine belt tensioner).
You can now remove the front timing cover. Make sure to align the camshaft and crankshaft timing marks before removing the timing belt. The camshaft pulley has a mark that needs to align with the mark on the head above the pulley. The crankshaft sprocket should line up at the same time with its mark at the top of the oil pump assembly. If you accidentally move the camshaft in some manner, after you remove the timing belt, you can damage the pistons or valves.
Next, to loosen the old timing belt, you need to look at the tensioner. Insert an 8 mm Allen wrench into the hexagon opening located on the front of the belt tensioner pulley. Rotate the pulley counterclockwise until it contacts the stop. While holding tensioner pulley against stop, insert a 1/8" or 3 mm diameter pin or Allen wrench through the hole located to the left of the hex opening. While pushing pin into hole, allow the tensioner pulley to rotate back. Almost immediately, the pin should engage the locking hole to prevent further movement of the pulley.ys there have been several "explosions" of the mechanical units with engine replacements needed; the tensioner actually blew a hole in the engine block. Of course, this is not a "free replacement" due to a manufacturing problem; you must purchase this item. Some of the latter models of the 2005 Neon have had the hydraulic units installed and all you need to purchase is the tensioner pulley which costs about $30. You can tell if you have the mechanical one when you actually get into and remove the timing belt; the mechanical unit has four pronounced legs, while the hydraulic unit is more of a plate (even though the holes align for both units). You must replace the back timing belt cover with a new tensioner installation (and it comes with the kit). Mine, of course, was the earlier model and required a complete plate, hydraulic unit and tensioner pulley replacement. And, of course, it was a dealer item only with a cost of $469. I had no choice but to drive (a borrowed auto) about 100 miles to a dealer that had one in stock.
While you are in there, you should replace the water pump. If you read all the bulletins and people's posts about this item going bad just after they finished the timing belt, you really should just purchase the water pump and make sure it has the seal in the kit (Mine did not include the water pump seal.). The water pump was only $40. If you have to replace it, you see all the trouble you must go through again to get it out of the timing belt area. The water pump is driven by the timing belt.
The oil pump is also driven by the timing belt; however, there are not many failures of the oil pumps.

Dec 01, 2009 | 2005 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

Honda Accord V6 2001


I can see that as being possible. Hondas are usually due for timing belt replacement at 90k though - has this been done on your car? If it has, then it doesn't need to be done again for 90k miles from the mileage it was originally done at. If your car needs this service, it's the big one. A timing belt service usually is the timing belt, the t-belt tensioner, accessory belts, any tensioners for them, water pump, thermostat, spark plugs, and all filters and fluids. That price may be somewhat on the high end, and I think you should comparison shop a few places to see where their pricing comes in, but I can believe that quote (the $920 quote, not the $1600 - that's ridiculous).

Jul 28, 2008 | 2001 Honda Accord

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