Tip & How-To about 1999 Ford Escort

Starting and Charging

All starting systems are basically the same in operation for manufacturers. The starter takes power from the battery to crank the engine. Generally the large wire on the starter is from the battery and the small wire is from the ignition switch. The large wire will have battery voltage on it all the time, the small wire will only have voltage when the ignition key is turned into the start position.

The altenator on all vehicles is designed to provide power for all car electronics while the engine is running, there is a large wire (usually red) that comes from the battery, and two to three small ones that come from other circuts to regulate how much power comes out on the large red wire.

The only relationship between the altenator and starter, is the battery, it is important to remember that the starter takes power in the form of amperage from the battery, while the altenator send power in the form of amperage to the battery. Thus an altenator can never be the cause of a vehicle that will not start. These two systems only share the battery and other than that they are not connected.

Posted by on

1999 Ford Escort Logo

Related Topics:

Related Questions:

1 Answer

2004 windstar wont start plenty of power but wont start no clicking sounds


What year ? For the 2004 model year, the Windstar was renamed the Ford Freestar. Anti-theft light lit on instrument cluster ? Battery good ! How about the battery cables ? Voltage drop test the starting system . Videos on you tube Starter Voltage Drop
Starter System The starting system cranks the engine at a speed fast enough to permit the engine to start.
  • Heavy cables, connectors and switches are used because of the large current required by the starter motor (11002) while it cranks the engine.
  • The amount of resistance in the starting circuit must be kept to a minimum to provide maximum current for starter motor operation.
  • A discharged or damaged battery (10655), loose or corroded connections or partially broken cables will cause slower than normal cranking speeds and may prevent the starter motor from cranking the engine.
The starting system includes:
  • the permanent magnet gear-reduction starter motor with a solenoid-actuated drive.
  • the battery.
  • a starter switch (part of the ignition switch (11572)).
  • the transmission range (TR) sensor.
  • The TR sensor in the starter control circuit prevents operation of the starter motor unless the selector lever is in NEUTRAL or PARK.
  • Starter Relay-Interrupt The starter relay (14N089) interrupt-consists of:
    • pull-in coil and
    • contacts.
    When the ignition switch is in the START position:
    • Current passes through the starterrelay-interrupt from the engine compartment power distribution box to the starter solenoid (11390) .
    • Anti-theft controller module activates relay-interrupt.
    • Pull-in coil in the starter relay-interrupt is activated and pulls the contacts apart.
    The starter relay-interrupt is deactivated when the ignition switch is in the RUN or OFF position.

Oct 22, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I changed my starter in my 2007 pontiac g6 it still won't start. I checked the battery and the alternator both good. Help!


Is there a SECRUITY light lit on your instrument cluster ? Did you check the starter relay in the under hood fuse / relay center ?
For ignition switch power modes refer to Body Control System Description and Operation . Once the ignition is placed in the Run/Crank position, the control circuit of the Run/Crank relay is grounded by the body control module (BCM). With the Run/Crank relay switch closed, battery positive voltage flows through it and on to the park/neutral position (PNP) switch. With the PNP switch in either the Park or Neutral position, battery positive voltage will flow to the START relay coil supply voltage input terminal of the engine control module (ECM) and the coil side of the START relay. Placing the ignition in the START position sends a message to the ECM requesting engine start. If the ECM has determined that the transmission is in Park or Neutral and theft is not active, it will supply 12 volts to the control circuit of the START relay. Battery positive voltage will then flow through the switch side of the START relay to the S terminal of the starter solenoid, cranking the engine.
I suggest you take this to someone knowledgeable in new car electronics . There is a lot going on here , modules talking to each other on GMLAN serial data communication network . If no anti-theft system problems The BCM sends a message to the PCM on the GMLAN telling it to energize the run / crank relay ! If you knew vehicle systems you could check for power an control of the start relay right at the relay base / socket !
VEHICLE RELAYS Operation Diagnosis

Jul 24, 2015 | Pontiac Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Stopped starting , never ever had a problem starting


Check the battery. They go bad every 2-5 years.

Aug 31, 2014 | 1998 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

starter wont engage after replacing dead battery


Check power to starter motor solenoid, solenoid operation and starter motor voltage during cranking. If the starter motor is receiving power from the solenoid, but isn't cranking, then replace the starter motor.

Also check the condition of battery terminals, wiring and connections. Also check the earth wire from the body to the engine.

Nov 12, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

there is a wire is the starter that needs replace but cant get to needing to know what the name of the wire is called. Its a copper wire thats connected to the starter


if it's a big wire about 1/2' thick, it is the battery cable from the battery positive post to the starter, it provides the heavy current to run the starter.
Another small wire is the 12 volts low current that activates the starter relay which in turn connects the battery cable to the starter motor.
what is starter doing or not doing?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Starter System The starting system cranks the engine at a speed fast enough to permit the engine to start.
  • Heavy cables, connectors and switches are used in the starting system because of the large current required by the starter motor (11002) while it is cranking the engine.
  • The amount of resistance in the starting circuit must be kept to an absolute minimum to provide maximum current for starter motor operation.
  • A discharged or damaged battery (10653) , loose or corroded connections or partially broken cables will result in slower-than-normal cranking speeds. These concerns may even prevent the starter motor from cranking the engine.
  • In case of starting system difficulty, the operator may have discharged the battery before calling for assistance.
  • A road service procedure is described in this section to aid the service technician in such cases of a discharged battery .
The starting system includes the following:
  • the permanent magnet gear-reduction starter motor with a solenoid-actuated drive
  • the battery
  • a remote control starter switch (part of the ignition switch (11572) )
  • the transmission range (TR) sensor
  • the starter solenoid (11390)
  • heavy circuit wiring
Vehicles equipped with an automatic transmission have a transmission range (TR) sensor in the starter control circuit. This sensor prevents operation of the starter motor unless the transmission range selector lever is in the NEUTRAL or PARK position.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

708386b.gif

Feb 24, 2010 | 1998 Ford Crown Victoria

Not finding what you are looking for?

619 people viewed this tip

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Ford Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76051 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22156 Answers

fordexpert

Level 3 Expert

5516 Answers

Are you a Ford Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Loading...